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i've written a gadget for Windows Sidebar. This essentially means that it is a miniature web-page, that runs for months on end.

After a few weeks the memory usage (working set) of the sidebar.exe process that houses 3rd party gadgets runs into the hundreds of megabytes.

Without a way to identify the source of memory leaks, i simply assume it is the rumored XMLHttpRequest closure problem. Although in my case i'm not doing it asynchronously. So i guess it's just JAX rather than AJAX.

The javascript function involving the web hit:

function FetchXML(method, url)
{
   var xmlHttp;
   try
   {
      // Firefox, Opera 8.0+, Safari  
      xmlHttp=new XMLHttpRequest();  
   }
   catch (e)
   {  // Internet Explorer  
      try
      {
         xmlHttp=new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");    
      }
      catch (e)
       {
         try
         {
            xmlHttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");      
         }
         catch (e)
         {
            throw "XMLHttp not supported"
         }
      }
   }

   xmlHttp.open(method, url, false);
   xmlHttp.send(null);  
   if (xmlHttp.status != 200)
   {
      throw "Server returned status code "+xmlHttp.status.toString();
   }

   if (xmlHttp.responseXML.parseError.errorCode != 0)
   {
      throw "Error in returned XML: "+xmlHttp.responseXML.parseError.reason;
   }

   var responseXML = xmlHttp.responseXML;
   xmlHttp = null;
   return responseXML;
}

Does this look like it could ever be the source of a memory leak?


i fear that without an actual closure i'm back to square one.

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1  
You can replace your whole Try Catch statement with just "xmlHttp=new XMLHttpRequest();". Only the IE engine is used to display a gadget. – ZippyV Aug 2 '09 at 13:56

Also, DOM objects and JavaScript objects live in different memory spaces, so if you have circular references like

  table = [];
  table[0] = document.getElementById('myDiv');
  table[0].ownerTable = table;

then neither the array nor the div will ever get garbage collected, even if all other references to the two objects have gone out of scope.

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Your question is too old to be affected with this, but for anyone who happens to run across it later...

Windows 7 64bit SP1 introduced a sidebar.exe memory leak (and some people report similar problems were happening in Vista). The suggested workaround in this blog post worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
To quote that blog's own author about his own workaround, "Any person with a lick of common sense will tell you it doesn’t fix the damn problem" – Ian Boyd Sep 21 '11 at 13:45
    
Yep. That's why it's called workaround and not the fix. :) – Domchi Sep 21 '11 at 22:57

This is a bit of a late answer but I noticed this had gone unanswered. Looking at your code, you're running synchronously and there are no circular references. I doubt that is the source of the memory leak and it's likely to be somewhere else in your code. I've come across memory leaks in Windows Desktop Gadgets before and the biggest one I've found is when dynamically adding script tags to the document (for instance, when using JSON callback methods from a web service).

Incidentally, the browser checks you're running are almost completely redundant. IE7, the lowest version of IE allowable on Vista, introduced the XMLHttpRequest() object (although it can be disabled by a user or system administrator). I would recommend just using the following single line to replace it:

xmlHttp = window.XMLHttpRequest ? new XMLHttpRequest() : new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");


Two years later, I get an up vote here and rediscover the question and the answer occurs to me straight away. I remembered seeing the following warning on the MDN tutorial for XMLHttpRequest:

Note: You shouldn't use synchronous XMLHttpRequests because, due to the inherently asynchronous nature of networking, there are various ways memory and events can leak when using synchronous requests.

I'm struggling a little to find out if this is true or just added by some random person to aid fear mongering (it is a wiki, after all), but perhaps this is the explanation for your memory leak.

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