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<title>New Web Project</title>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var paras = document.getElementsByTagName("p");
            for (var i=0; i< paras.length; i++) {
            var title_text = paras[i].getAttribute("title");
            if (title_text != null) {
                alert(title_text);
                }
            }

        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <h1>New Web Project Page</h1>
        <p title="test"> This is just a test</p>
    </body>

why the alert has no value? i feel it should popup the text test.

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You're calling the JS before the DOM is complete. –  Dave Newton Aug 30 '12 at 1:35
    
If you are okay with jQuery then wrap it up in document.ready just check it out.. –  Dhruvenkumar Shah Aug 30 '12 at 1:35
    
Why you not use jQuery? –  Ascension Aug 30 '12 at 1:42
    
+1. While it's not a great question as far as the text itself, it provides the relevant info (code being used, explanation of what you expected and what you got instead, and what you want to know). @Ascension: What difference does that make? It has nothing to do with the question asked. –  Ken White Aug 30 '12 at 1:44
    
@KenWhite, it was just a suggestion for future use, not to answer the question. So put as comment. –  Ascension Aug 30 '12 at 1:53
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because when the script is evaluated, p has not been loaded yet.

If you add the script right after p, when p is already rendered, it will show the alert as expected:

<p title="test"> This is just a test</p>
<script type="text/javascript">
  var paras = document.getElementsByTagName("p");
  for (var i=0; i< paras.length; i++) {
    var title_text = paras[i].getAttribute("title");
    if (title_text != null) {
      alert(title_text);
    }
}
</script>

See DEMO.

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Because you initialize the script before html elements are rendered.

Move the script to bottom or wait for DOM. Like this:

<html>
<head>
<title>New Web Project</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        window.onload = function(){
            var paras = document.getElementsByTagName("p");
            for (var i=0; i< paras.length; i++) {
            var title_text = paras[i].getAttribute("title");
            if (title_text != null) {
                alert(title_text);
                }
            }
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <h1>New Web Project Page</h1>
    <p title="test"> This is just a test</p>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
While you are correct about the OP calling getElementsByTagName before the document is complete, the first few lines of your code aren't doing anything useful. The second assignment to window.onload replaces the first, so if any previous function had been assigned, it isn't called. –  RobG Aug 30 '12 at 5:46
    
The first line is for some versions of IE that don't know about window.onload, so I am creating a function for that if it doesn't exist –  Mihai Iorga Aug 30 '12 at 6:40
1  
The third line of the above means that whatever was previously assigned to window.onload will never be called. What versions of IE don't support window.onload? Certainly IE 6+ does, and I'd be very surprised if versions 5 or 4 didn't. –  RobG Aug 30 '12 at 12:46
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