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I am trying to get a variable from a php class without having to use "new classname()"

This is my code:

class myVars {
    static $varx = null;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->varx = "test";
    }
}

echo myVars::$varx;

I also tried replacing $this-> with self::, but nothing gets printed. How should I code the class in order to call myVars::$varx?

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4  
self:: is correct, but the constructor won't get called unless you actually create an instance. –  minitech Aug 30 '12 at 1:46
    
How does the accepted answer work? I really don't understand the point in creating a class if you set and get from outside class? –  Mihai Iorga Aug 30 '12 at 2:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem you are having, is that you are not instantiating an object, so the constructor never gets called.

What you could do is:

class myVars {
    static $varx = null;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->varx = "test";
    }
}

myVars::$varx = "test";
echo myVars::$varx;

Or you could create an object and have the constructor change the static variable.

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How does that make a difference if you set and then get same value? It will always return test from myVars::$varx –  Mihai Iorga Aug 30 '12 at 2:02
    
@Mihai Iorga This is just to show how you can set it without instantiating an object. In an application these lines and the class would probably be spread over different files / methods / etc.. –  jeroen Aug 30 '12 at 12:43

This should make your static variable publicly accessible.

class myVars {
    public static $varx = null;

    public function __construct() {
        self::$varx = "test";
    }
}

echo myVars::$varx;

However, in your example, the constructor is never called, so the modification to the static variable is never made.

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@Mythrill "test" doesn't get printed when I run that code. –  James Harzs Aug 30 '12 at 1:48
    
As jeroen mentioned, you never call the constructor. –  Lucas Green Aug 30 '12 at 1:52

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