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I am running into this weird issue when trying to compare the performance of data type 'int' and 'long', basically I have two unit tests:

@Test
public void testLongOperationPerformance(){
    StopWatch sw = new StopWatch();
    sw.start();
    long count = 0l;
    for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i ++){
        count++;
    }
    sw.stop();
    System.out.println(count);
    System.out.println(sw.elaspedTimeInMilliSeconds());
}

@Test
public void testIntegerOperationPerformance(){
    StopWatch sw = new StopWatch();
    sw.start();
    int count = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i ++){
        count++;
    }
    sw.stop();
    System.out.println(count);
    System.out.println(sw.elaspedTimeInMilliSeconds());
}

These two unit tests are doing the same thing, difference is one use int as the data type for counter and the other uses long for that. The result:

jdk6u32 (64 bit):
test with long
2147483635
96
test with int
2147483647
2

jdk7 (64 bit)
test with long
2147483647
1599
test with int
2147483647
1632

I noticed:

  1. in jdk6u32, test with int is much faster than test with long
  2. in jdk6u32, test results are different between test with int and test with long
  3. in jdk7, both tests are about the same fast and they're both much slower than jdk6u32
  4. in jdk7, both tests got the same result

Can anyone explain why it is like that?

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Are you saying that jdk6u32 returns the wrong number (missing 12 iterations)? –  Thilo Aug 30 '12 at 3:36
    
Are you sure about the code you posted and the results: it seems very strange that with JDK the long test is sipping part of the loop. –  Matteo Aug 30 '12 at 5:23
    
You should also choose tests that are not so trivial. The compiler or JIT could optimize your code and easily remove the loop at once since the value of count at the end can be easily computed. –  Matteo Aug 30 '12 at 5:24
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1 Answer

The Java JIT is particularly good at eliminating code which doesn't do anything. In your example, the loop

long count = 0l;
for(int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i ++){
    count++;
}

can be replaced with

long count = 0l;
count += Integer.MAX_VALUE * 1;

What you are timing is how long it takes to detect and remove the loop. This time can depend on what it has done before so I would suggest testing the loops in a different order to see if that changes the results.

In Java 6 & 7, a number of loop optimisations were optimised incorrectly.

e.g. This infinite loop was not always infinite for some updates

for(int i=0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i += 2)

For this reason, some updates have different optimisations on or off depending on whether they worked for that version. I suggest trying the latest version of Java 7 to see if it makes a difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Peter. What I don't get is that if JDK6 did optimization with the test code why jdk7 didn't. –  seiya Aug 30 '12 at 13:42
    
Also, even if the JIT did the code replacement the result shouldn't be diffirent,right? The result with jdk6 and type long is not even correct. –  seiya Aug 30 '12 at 13:43
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