Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I use a variable in a command used for open along with (-|) pipe output where the filename is interpreted as a command that pipes output to us.

$cmd = 'ps -elf';
open( my $fh, "-|",$cmd  ) || die( "$cmd failed: $! " );

Here I want $cmd = 'ps $myOptions'; where $myOptions will be set to the required options lets say for example $myOptions = "-elf"

How can this be done?

share|improve this question
1  
Your code should work although you will need double quotes (") around the value of $cmd and all vars will have to be defined in a sane order –  amon Aug 30 '12 at 3:57

3 Answers 3

You can use the string concatenation for this as $cmd = "ps ".$myOptions;

share|improve this answer
    
no neither string concatenation nor double (") work in this scenario, i tried all this before posting my question :( –  Pinky Sharma Aug 30 '12 at 5:10

Double quoting the pipe works for me:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $cmd = 'ps';
my $opt = "-elf";
open( my $fh, "-|", "$cmd $opt"  ) || die( "$cmd failed: $! " );

while( <$fh>) { print "line $.: $_"; }

Also working: "ps $opt", join( ' ', $cmd, $opt), $cmd . ' ' . $optand probably many other ways. You just have to make sure that the 3rd argument to open is a string, with the proper contentps -elf`. For this you have to make sure you interpolate the variables (ie no single quote), and you don't end up with a list instead of a string (ie concatenate or use variables between double quotes).

share|improve this answer

If you want to specify the command as a single string (e.g, if your options may actually consist of several arguments):

my $cmd = "ps $myOptions";
open my $fh, "$cmd |" or die "$cmd failed: $!";

If you want to specify it as two strings (e.g, if $myOptions should always be treated as a single argument):

open my $fh, "-|", "ps", $myOptions or die "ps $myOptions failed: $!";
share|improve this answer
    
no it just runs $myOptions as a command not the actual command ps along with options in $myOptions :( –  Pinky Sharma Aug 30 '12 at 6:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.