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Is there a significant complexity difference between these two implementation or does the compiler optimize it anyway?

Usage:

for(int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    foreach(var item in GoodItems)
    {
        if(DoSomethingBad(item))
           break; // this is later added.
    }
}

Implementation (1):

public IEnumerable<T> GoodItems
{
   get { return _list.Where(x => x.IsGood); }
}

Implementation (2):

public IEnumerable<T> GoodItems
{
   get { foreach(var item in _list.Where(x => x.IsGood)) yield return item; }
}

It appears that IEnumerable methods should always be implemented using (2)? When is one better than the other?

share|improve this question
1  
Why does it appear that option 2 is better? –  ChaosPandion Aug 30 '12 at 4:06
2  
I don't know about you, but the first option looks beautiful. The second reeks of boilerplate code which isn't even necessary. Occam's razor applies here. –  Mike Bantegui Aug 30 '12 at 4:24
    
@MikeBantegui - Well beauty is quite subjective but I think everyone can agree that it has a high signal to noise ratio. –  ChaosPandion Aug 30 '12 at 4:31
    
Why do you have the outer for loop? –  Enigmativity Aug 30 '12 at 4:35
    
@ChaosPandion(edited qns) I don't know. I thought the first would collect the items and return a reference to a list. Whereas the second would yield return and hence breaks out early in the usage part. –  Jake Aug 30 '12 at 5:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Internally, the first version gets compiled down to something that looks like this:

public IEnumerable<T> GoodItems
{
    get
    {
        foreach (var item in _list)
            if (item.IsGood)
                yield return item;
    }
}

Whereas the second one will now look something like:

public IEnumerable<T> GoodItems
{
    get
    {
        foreach (var item in GoodItemsHelper)
            yield return item;
    }
}

private IEnumerable<T> GoodItemsHelper
{
    get
    {
        foreach (var item in _list)
            if (item.IsGood)
                yield return item;
    }
}

The Where clause in LINQ is implemented with deferred execution. So there's no need to apply the foreach (...) yield return ... pattern. You're making more work for yourself, and potentially for the runtime.

I don't know if the second version gets jitted to the same thing as the first. Semantically, the two are distinct in that the first does a single round of deferred execution while the second does two rounds. On those grounds I'd argue that the second would be more complex.

The real question you need to ask is: When you're exposing the IEnumerable, what guarantees are you making? Are you saying that you want to simply provide forward iteration? Or are you stating that your interface provides deferred execution?

In the code below, my intent for is to simply provide forward enumeration without random access:

private List<Int32> _Foo = new List<Int32>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

public IEnumerable<Int32> Foo
{
    get
    {
        return _Foo;
    }
}

But here, I want to prevent unnecessary computation. I want my expensive computation to be performed only when a result is requested.

private List<Int32> _Foo = new List<Int32>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

public IEnumerable<Int32> Foo
{
    get
    {
        foreach (var item in _Foo)
        {
            var result = DoSomethingExpensive(item);
            yield return result;
        }
    }
}

Even though both versions of Foo look identical on the outside, their internal implementation does different things. That's the part that you need to watch out for. When you use LINQ, you don't need to worry about deferring execution since most operators do it for you. In your own code, you may wish to go with the first or second depending on your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
I highly doubt the JIT will inline any of the extra method calls that are required. At most you might see a simple method inlined if its not too complex. –  ChaosPandion Aug 30 '12 at 4:45
    
@ChaosPandion: I'd also argue that the two are completely different. If you have funky implicit cast operators and varying return types, the two implementations can have different outputs. For that reason alone I doubt the JIT can inline them. –  Mike Bantegui Aug 30 '12 at 4:54
    
Sorry I edited my question to show that I break out early in the foreach loop. To make it clearer what I was asking about. Please revise answer if there is a need. Thank you. –  Jake Aug 30 '12 at 5:37

I just built an example program and then used ILSpy to examine the output assembly. The second option will actually generate an extra class that wraps the call to Where but adds zero value to the code. The extra layer the code must follow will probably not cause performance issues in most programs but consider all the extra syntax just to perform the same thing at a slightly slower speed. Not worth it in my book.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I edited my question to show that I break out early in the foreach loop. To make it clearer what I was asking about. Please revise answer if there is a need. Thank you. –  Jake Aug 30 '12 at 5:37
    
@Jake - Actually I think my answer still applies. Although your break statement makes the performance consideration even more irrelevant. –  ChaosPandion Aug 30 '12 at 5:46

where uses yield return internally. You don't need to wrap it in another yield return.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I was just examining the implementation and it is hand written. –  ChaosPandion Aug 30 '12 at 4:20
    
More specifically, (most of) LINQ uses deferred execution. Simply returning the result of the Where clause is enough. By iterating over the Where clause via the foreach (...) yield return you're basically wasting more resources (hardware and manpower). –  Mike Bantegui Aug 30 '12 at 4:22
    
Sorry I edited my question to show that I break out early in the foreach loop. To make it clearer what I was asking about. Please revise answer if there is a need. Thank you. –  Jake Aug 30 '12 at 5:36

You do _list.where(x => x.IsGood); in both. With that said, isn't it obvious which has to be the better usage?

yield return has its usages, but this scenario, especially in a getter, is not the one

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the first would collect all the items and then return an IEnumerable reference; whereas the second would yield return and hence break out early in the usage part. –  Jake Aug 30 '12 at 5:52

The extra code without payload in "implementation 2" is the less evil here.

Both variants lead to undesirable creation of new object each time you call the property getter. So, results of two sequential getter calls will not be equal:

interface IItem
{
    bool IsGood { get; set; }
}

class ItemsContainer<T>
    where T : IItem
{
    private readonly List<T> items = new List<T>();

    public IEnumerable<T> GoodItems
    {
        get { return items.Where(item => item.IsGood); }
    }

    // ...
}

// somewhere in code
class Item : IItem { /* ... */ }

var container = new ItemsContainer<Item>();
Console.WriteLine(container.GoodItems == container.GoodItems); // False; Oops!

You should avoid this side-effect:

class ItemsContainer<T>
    where T : IItem
{
    private readonly List<T> items;
    private readonly Lazy<IEnumerable<T>> goodItems;

    public ItemsContainer()
    {
        this.items = new List<T>();
        this.goodItems = new Lazy<IEnumerable<T>>(() => items.Where(item => item.IsGood));
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> GoodItems
    {
        get { return goodItems.Value; }
    }

    // ...
}

or make a method instead of property:

public IEnumerable<T> GetGoodItems()
{
  return _list.Where(x => x.IsGood);
}

Also, the property is not a good idea, if you want to provide snapshot of your items to the client code.

share|improve this answer
    
I am going to try this later, but just thinking out loud, what happens if contents of this.item changes in between calls. Does this.goodItems gets "refreshed". Cos' IEnumerable is not the same as Enumerator? Or am I mistaken? –  Jake Aug 30 '12 at 7:42
    
this.goodItems.Value will reflect changes, made to original items collection, because each iteration will create new enumerator through GetEnumerator() method call. –  Dennis Aug 30 '12 at 7:54

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