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I have a set of objects. I also have a set of required objects, containing between 0 and 3 objects. I'm trying to find all combinations of 3 objects from the initial set that include the required objects.

Edit: Example --

objects: {A,B,C,D,E}
required: {A}
output: {A,B,C}, {A,B,D}, {A,B,E}, {A,C,D}, {A,C,E}, {A,D,E}

objects: {A,B,C,D,E}
required: {A,B}
output: {A,B,C}, {A,B,D}, {A,B,E}

The obvious, but slow, solution is something like:

for(int i = 0; i < objects.size()-2 ; i++){
  for(int j = i; j < objects.size()-1 ; j++){
    for(int k = j; k < objects.size() ; k++){
      if(required.contains(i) || required.contains (j) || required.contains(k)){
        results.add(new Result(i,j,k));
      }
    }
  }
}

This solution traverses the entire search space regardless of required objects.

Another approach I came up with was to write custom code for each number of required objects:

switch (required.size()){
case 3:
  results.add(new Result(required));
  break;
case 2:
  Object a = requiredIngredients.toArray()[0];
  Object b = requiredIngredients.toArray()[1];
  for(Object o : objects){
    if(!required.contains(i)){
      results.add(new Result(EnumSet.of(o, a, b)));
    }
  }
  break;

etc..

This works, but is obnoxious and not generalizable.

A third approach is to make three separate sets, shrinking sets to include only a required value if requirements are present, then iterate over them normally:

  for(Object i : firstObjects){
    for(Object j : secondObjects){
      if(i == j) continue;
      for(Object k : thirdObjects){
        if(j == k) continue;
        results.add(new Result(i,j,k));
      }
    }
  }

This seems somewhat better, but produces duplicate combinations. Eg. It would return both ABC and ACB as two separate results. I could have the result set recognize duplicates, but I'd prefer not to calculate it to begin with.

Hopefully these examples make the problem clear. I feel like someone has figured out how to solve this kind of problem already, but I'm having a hard time identifying the generalized problem type.

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1  
It sounds like you want to find all combinations of the intersection between "objects" and "required". Is that accurate? –  Vaughn Cato Aug 30 '12 at 4:50
    
Actually it's still not clear. Perhaps you could try precisely defining your expected inputs and outputs? Your examples aren't even enough to tell whether you care about order or not (the last one gives conflicting hints in this regard). Also it looks like you've got an off by one error in the first snippet. –  Antimony Aug 30 '12 at 4:50
    
All combinations of three values that is. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 30 '12 at 4:51
    
Ok, your example helped. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 30 '12 at 5:18
    
Does the output order matter? –  Vaughn Cato Aug 30 '12 at 5:27
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is a simple and general way, but maybe not the most efficient (in python):

from itertools import combinations

def combinations_including(n,objects,required):
  extra=objects-required
  return sorted([sorted(tuple(required)+x) for x in combinations(extra,n-len(required))])

print combinations_including(3,set('ABCDE'),set('A'))
print combinations_including(3,set('ABCDE'),set('AB'))

outputs

[['A', 'B', 'C'], ['A', 'B', 'D'], ['A', 'B', 'E'], ['A', 'C', 'D'], ['A', 'C', 'E'], ['A', 'D', 'E']]
[['A', 'B', 'C'], ['A', 'B', 'D'], ['A', 'B', 'E']]

If the required set is small, then it is probably worse than brute force, but as the size of the required set increases, it will become much more efficient than brute force. For example, if the required set is the same as the input set, then it finds the answer in constant time.

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This doesn't seem to be any computationally faster than brute force, but going to accept it as the best/only answer thus far. :P Thanks for the input, Vaughn. –  Alex Pritchard Sep 19 '12 at 22:32
1  
@AlexPritchard: If the required set is small, then it is probably worse than brute force, but as the size of the required set increases, it will become much more efficient than brute force. For example, if the required set is the same as the input set, then it finds the answer in constant time. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 20 '12 at 1:34
    
That's good to know! –  Alex Pritchard Sep 20 '12 at 21:36
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