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Perhaps I am misreading the question. For those of you who are unfamiliar with Project Euler's Problem 31, here is the problem:

Investigating combinations of English currency denominations.

In England the currency is made up of pound, £, and pence, p, and there are eight coins in general circulation:

1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1 (100p) and £2 (200p).

It is possible to make £2 in the following way:

1×£1 + 1×50p + 2×20p + 1×5p + 1×2p + 3×1p

How many different ways can £2 be made using any number of coins?

I see how this can be a dynamic programming problem, but I couldn't help but take a shortcut:

To solve this I broke down how many ways one can make one to six pence using 1p, 1p and 2p, and 1p, 2p, and 5p coins.

Using one penny coins only

  1. 1 combination
    • 1p
  2. 1 combination
    • 2×1p
  3. 1 combination
    • 3×1p
  4. 1 combination
    • 4×1p
  5. 1 combination
    • 5×1p
  6. 1 combination
    • 6×1p

Using one penny and two pence coins only

  1. 1 combination
    • 1p
  2. 2 combinations
    • 2p
    • 2×1p
  3. 2 combinations
    • 2p + 1p
    • 3×1p
  4. 3 combinations
    • 2×2p
    • 2p + 2×1p
    • 4×1p
  5. 3 combinations
    • 2×2p + 1p
    • 2p + 3×1p
    • 5×1p
  6. 4 combinations
    • 3×2p
    • 2×2p + 2×1p
    • 2p + 4×2p
    • 6×2p

Using one penny, two pence, and five pence coins only

  1. 1 combinations
    • 1p
  2. 2 combinations
    • 2p
    • 2×1p
  3. 2 combinations
    • 2p + 1p
    • 3×1p
  4. 3 combinations
    • 2×2p
    • 2p + 2×1p
    • 4×1p
  5. 4 combinations
    • 5p
    • 2×2p + 1p
    • 2p + 3×1p
    • 5×1p
  6. 5 combinations
    • 5p + 1p
    • 3×2p
    • 2×2p + 2×1p
    • 2p + 4×2p
    • 6×2p

I noticed that there is a pattern to this madness. Obviously, there is at most one way to obtain a desired "balance" with only one type of coin. For this problem's case, it is unnecessary to account for fractions of a penny. Therefore, using one penny coins only, there is exactly one way to obtain any nonnegative balance. Note that there is exactly one way to obtain a balance of zero: no coins.

With a quick glance, I noticed a pattern in the second example. The number of possible combinations is equal to the quotient of n / 2 plus 1 where n is any nonnegative integer. In Python (the language I wrote my solution in), this looks like the following:

n // 2 + 1

I noticed that the + 1 was adding the result of the previous example for that particular "target balance." Coincidence? Maybe. But after looking at the third example, I quickly noticed that the number of possible combinations was the following:

n // 5 + n // 2 + 1

I implemented this pattern where that it would account for all eight coins:

n // 200 + n // 100 + n // 50 + n // 20 + n // 10 + n // 5 + n // 2 + 1

With n set to 200, I deduced that the answer is 178. This number makes sense to me, though, I'm not going to write all the possible combinations myself. However, Project Euler states that this is incorrect.

I found on the web that the correct solution is 73682.

So my question to you, Stack Overflow users whom are still reading, where is the fallacy in my reasoning?

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I'm not sure if I can explain where it goes wrong, but your formula doesn't work for n >= 7. –  Blckknght Aug 30 '12 at 7:17
    
@Blckknght, It's interesting that you ask. No, when n is 7, the output is 5. However, I found that the answer is actually 6. Maybe my logic only works on the given examples coincidentally? I also just confirmed that it does not work with 8, 9, or 10. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 30 '12 at 7:23
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The correct number of combinations for making 10p using only [1, 2, 5] is 10, whereas your solution gives 10 / 5 + 10 / 2 + 1 = 2 + 5 + 1 = 8. Obviously your assumption is incorrect.

The mistake is that you are simply trying out a few cases and assuming what works for a few small cases will work for all cases, without any proof.

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Just confirmed above. The correct solution still sounds a bit farfetched to me. :/ I guess it wouldn't be that tough of a problem, though, if the solution was so small. Back to the drawing board. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 30 '12 at 7:34
    
@TylerCrompton: The solution is indeed dynamic programming, and not particularly tough if you have solved DP problems before. Let me know if you are stuck. –  MAK Aug 30 '12 at 7:39
    
I've solved my fair share of DP problems, so I should be able to handle it. Looking back at my "solution", I don't know why I ever thought that'd be correct. *shrugs shoulders* –  Tyler Crompton Aug 30 '12 at 8:54
    
And this is why deductive logic (as opposed to inductive logic) is so important in mathematics :) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 30 '12 at 13:56
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