Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to perform the following nested operations until the experession is satisfied.. Is there a :until keyword which stops doing further operations when the condition matches.?

This command generates the Pythagoran Triplet 3 4 5. I dont want it to do anything else once it gets to that sequence of numbers.

(for [a (range 1 100)
      b (range 1 100)
      c (list (Math/sqrt (+ (Math/pow (int a) 2) (Math/pow (int b) 2))))
      :when (= 12 (+ a b c))]
     (list a b c))
share|improve this question
1  
Can't you just "not" the conditional? –  jrockway Aug 2 '09 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

:while is a short-circuiting test in for expressions. List elements will be generated until the first time it encounters a failing test.

In your case

(for [<code omitted> :while (not (= 12 (+ a b c)))] (list a b c))

would stop generating elements as soon as it found the triplet summing to 12.

One problem though, it doesn't do what you're expecting. The triplet itself would not be part of the result since it failed the test.

A list comprehension may not be the best solution if you are only looking for a single matching result. Why not just use a loop?

(loop [xs (for [a (range 1 100)
                b (range 1 100)] [a, b])]
  (when (seq xs)
    (let [[a, b] (first xs)
          c (Math/sqrt (+ (Math/pow (int a) 2)
                          (Math/pow (int b) 2)))]
      (if (not (= 12 (+ a b c)))
        (recur (next xs))
        (list a b c)))))
share|improve this answer
    
I learned a lot from that code. Just a couple of questions: 1.What type does (for....) generate? 2.Why do you need to (seq xs)? –  unj2 Aug 2 '09 at 19:02
    
1) A lazy sequence. 2) To check for the case when xs is empty: (seq xs) will return nil when xs is empty, thus failing the test and exiting the loop. This is a fairly common idiom in Clojure. –  alanlcode Aug 2 '09 at 19:59

Since for yields a lazy sequence you will get the desired result by picking the first element:

(first (for [a (range 1 100)
             b (range 1 100)
             c (list (Math/sqrt (+ (Math/pow (int a) 2) 
                                   (Math/pow (int b) 2))))
             :when (= 12 (+ a b c))]
          (list a b c))

Only the first element of the generated list is computed due to laziness, which can be demonstrated with a side effect:

user=> (first
        (for [a (range 1 100)
              b (range 1 100)
              c (list (Math/sqrt (+ (Math/pow (int a) 2) 
                                    (Math/pow (int b) 2))))
              :when (= 12 (+ a b c))]
          (do (println "working...")
              (list a b c))))
working...
(3 4 5.0)

(for ...) comes with a :let modifier so there is no need to wrap c in a list:

(for [a (range 1 100)
      b (range 1 100)
      :let [c (Math/sqrt (+ (Math/pow (int a) 2) 
                            (Math/pow (int b) 2)))]
      :when (= 12 (+ a b c))]
  (list a b c))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the more functional solution. –  Mike Hartl Mar 18 '13 at 10:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.