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I'm trying to run this function:

os::TMXTileset* os::TMXMap::getTilesetFromGid(int gid)
    {
        TMXTileset* tileset;
        std::map<std::string, TMXTileset>::iterator it;
        std::map<std::string, TMXTileset>::iterator comp;

        for (it=tilesetMap.begin(); it != tilesetMap.end(); it++)
        {
            comp = it;
            comp++;
            if ((gid >= it->second.getFirstGid()) && (gid < comp->second.getFirstGid()))
            {
                return &it->second;
            }
        }
        tileset = &it->second;
        return tileset;
    }

..but it is giving me this error:

"map/set iterator not derefrencable"

My first thought was to stop dereferencing it (using it->second instead of (*it).second), but that didn't change anything at all.

Any ideas?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you first copy it, then you advance the copy and then you dereference the copy. This means you dereference end() whenever it is on the element before the last element.

You can easily test this on a map with 1 entry only - it should always fail to dereference comp.

you should do something like:

TMXTileset* tileset;
std::map<std::string, TMXTileset>::iterator it;
std::map<std::string, TMXTileset>::iterator comp;

for (it=tilesetMap.begin(); /*it != tilesetMap.end() can be ommited due to check for comp */; it++)
{
    comp = it;
    comp++;
    if (comp == tilesetMap.end())
    {
       break;
    }
    ...
}
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Thanks, that was perfect. I thought that end() referred to the last element, which explains my mistake. Thanks! –  DormoTheNord Aug 30 '12 at 7:44
1  
consider using pre-increment (++i) instead of post-increment. Especially in cases with iterators, this can be faster. You should also reduce the scope of it and comp in case you don't need it. The new c++ keyword auto is very helpful for that. Just remove the declarations for it and comp and put a auto in front of their first usage. ( for (auto it=tilsetMap.begin() ... and auto comp = it; ) –  Tobias Langner Aug 30 '12 at 11:28
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Your for loop runs beyond the end of the map if it is not interrupted, so your third-last line will fail.

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no - it doesn't. The setup for the for loop is correct. –  Tobias Langner Aug 30 '12 at 11:25
    
Sure it does. The for loop stops when it == tilesetMap.end (), and then it->second is not defined. –  JohnB Aug 30 '12 at 11:41
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