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I bet that I could find the answer of this question from reading similar threads here or by googling, but I would like "hear" it first hand so to speak because it's an anomaly in my understanding.

So here's the thing, I have some code which a previous employee wrote and I see a lot of a certain type of construct which looks rather odd to me and I just want to clarify what is "right and wrong".

For example

- (void) setWwanServiceId: (NSString *) newValue {
    [wwanServiceId autorelease];
    wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];
}

Here wwanServiceIdis a NSString member of the class, and to me this seem like a strange way to do it. As far as I understand it would begin by putting an autorelease on the object, basically saying: "whenever this object seem to not be used, release it for me I don't really care" then the copy will up the retain count +1 on.... wwanServiceId? or newValue? I guess the first.

Then to make me all more confused let's just quickly run through the life-cycle of the wwanServiceId-string..

basically the value will be set if we receive a notification which then from the notification-handler method will call the above -setWwanServiceId: method. other than that it will only ever be accessed for reading, so we are safe to say that it will at any given point:

  1. put autorelease on object
  2. retain a new string copy

Then there is one more quirk to this and this is where I am getting rather suspicious, namely in the -dealloc method which looks like this:

- (void) dealloc {
    [[self wwanServiceId] release];
    [super dealloc];
}

So what happens there? it will afaik release the wwanServiceId and as I said the only time it's memory management is being touched (if I haven't missed anything but I feel pretty sure) is to put an autorelease and retain it.

So to summarize: Is the idea here that he thought that since he always retain a new copy after putting autorelease he need to release it in the end.. or well it's the only thing I can think about. Or just felt it would be safe to do an extra release in the end just in case..?

Because as far as I understand it, if this setter is called one time it will put an autorelease (-1 in future), do a retain (+1) and when destructor is called it will do the "final release" (-1).

Any ideas or suggestions helping me understand (if in fact I am wrong and the memory handling is correct as is) would be appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To be short and helpful:

This is wrong:

- (void) setWwanServiceId: (NSString *) newValue {
    [wwanServiceId autorelease];
    wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];
}

This is right:

- (void) setWwanServiceId: (NSString *) newValue {
    if (newValue != wwanServiceId) {
        [wwanServiceId release];
        wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];
    }
}

To explain in short:

[wwanServiceId autorelease]; is an unnecessary sent message, because autoreleasing an object will reduce the retain count at some unknown point in the future. And in the next line you are wwanServiceId = [newValue copy]; instantly setting the instance variable. So, in your memory you now have a to be autoreleased object and a new object. One of them is too much The new object is, where the pointer of your IVar is pointing to. The old one is swimming in your Memory Pool with probably no reference to it :-)

Autorelease as few as possible or use ARC.

Oh: And in the dealloc method, please do not send the message like this:

[[self wwanServiceId] release];

Better like this:

[wwanServiceId release];

as Apple recommends to work directly with instance methods in init and dealloc methods, instead of using getters and setters there.

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1  
Thank you, that kind of shed light on all the concerns I had when seeing that piece of code. I felt rather confused thinking that maybe it's good practice or something to do it like it was, but I felt very insecure seeing the [[self wwanServiceId] release] of the dealloc and it felt really strange to set an autorelease and well it gave me a lot of confusion. So thanks for clearing that up, I needed the guidance! –  qrikko Aug 30 '12 at 11:16
    
Cool, that's what StackOverflow is there for –  Fab1n Aug 30 '12 at 11:19

You wrote:

Here wwanServiceIdis a NSString member of the class, and to me this seem like a strange way to do it. As far as I understand it would begin by putting an autorelease on the object, basically saying: "whenever this object seem to not be used, release it for me I don't really care" then the copy will up the retain count +1 on.... wwanServiceId? or newValue? I guess the first.

This seems to point to the source of your confusion. wwanServiceId is a variable which can contain a reference to an object of type NSString. Variables do not have reference counts only objects do.

The previous employee wrote:

- (void) setWwanServiceId: (NSString *) newValue {
   [wwanServiceId autorelease];
   wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];
}

The expression [wwanServiceId autorelease] means: read the reference stored in wwanServiceId and autorelease the object that reference refers to - let's call that object A. Important: This does not delete object A; it will be released as some later stage and if at that time there are no remaining references object A will be deleted.

The expression [newValue copy] means: read the reference stored in newValue, use that to locate the object (call it object B), make a copy of that object to produce a new object (call it object C), and return a reference to the new object. This new object is owned by the caller of copy, so there is no need to retain it.

Finally the assignment stores the reference to object C into wwanServiceId.

So there is a maximum of three distinct objects involved:

  1. A: the original object referenced by wwanServiceId, this is autoreleased to remove the ownership of wwanServiceId.
  2. B: the object referenced by newValue, this is left untouched
  3. C: a newly created copy of B owned through wwanServiceId

Why "autorelease" in the code and "maximum of three distinct" above?

The method could be called with newValue referencing object A, e.g. as in:

[self setWwanServiceId:[self wwanServiceId]]

If this was to occur and (a) release was used instead of autorelease and (b) there was no other reference to object A then the release would delete object A and then when [newValue copy] was evaluated newValue would be referencing a deleted object... The use of autorelease in this case delays the deletion until after the copy.

So what the previous employee wrote is not in any way "wrong", but as some of the other answer suggest it may be an unusual style. Another way you see this written is:

- (void) setWwanServiceId: (NSString *) newValue
{
   NSString *oldValue = wwanServiceId;
   wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];
   [oldValue release];
}

which also ensures any deletion occurs after the copy.

HTH.

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Most helpful, thank you very much for taking the time to really explain the concepts involved at such a deep level. I appreciate that you took the time to explain why it would be ok to do it that way, given me a lot of insight and hopefully will also help me further my understanding of the style employed by my predecessor. –  qrikko Aug 30 '12 at 11:22

Debug it and have a look.

[wwanServiceId autorelease];

wwanServiceId has an address. This statement does not change it. It does decrement the retain count of this object though. Thats it.

wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];

This statement creates a new object. The new object is a copy of newValue. Compare the addresses of the objects and you will see, that the address inn wwanServiceId will vary from the address of newValue and it will vary from the address that wwanServiceId did have just before the statement was executed.

The retain, that is implicit in copy will affect wwanServiceId, but it affects the new object, that was just creaed with copy. It does not affect the wwanServiceId object which was autoreleased during the statement before.

At some point after the execution of setWwanServiceId had finished, the old and autoreleased object will dissappear. (Assuming that the retain count is 0 now. If it is >0 because it is still retained for other reasons or just for error, then it will remain and potentially cause a leak.)

Once you understood that you will not question any more what is happening in the dealloc method. wwanServiceId is released. Meaning its retain count is reduced by 1. In the event that it is 0 then it will be deallocated automatically. You could even autorelease it there too. The diffrerence to autorelease is basically that an autoreleased object is still around and available while the current method is being executed. Its release comes into effect at some later point in time.

But there is no reason for autoreleasing the object in dealloc. In the example given there is not even a good reason to autorelease the object in the setter setWwanServiceId. You may well release the object directly in both methods.

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Assuming wwanServiceId is the private ivar mapped by the getter wwanServiceId and setter setWwanServiceId, I think it is not correct to autorelease the ivar in the setter. I would have coded the following:

- (void) setWwanServiceId: (NSString *) newValue {
    if (newValue != wwanServiceId) {
        [wwanServiceId release];
        wwanServiceId = [newValue copy];
    }
}

What I mean is: it is not necessary to give ownership of your var to the autorelease pool (which it may be drained at the end of the application). Simply release the ivar. If someone is using it, no problem, it will have a strong reference to it. Otherwise it will be deallocated.

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