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I work now since one year following Scrum, TDD, Domain Driven Design and Uncle Bob's recipes.. but I have some doubt about are we applying the various principles, mostly while reading "Java Application Architecture" (from now JAA) always from Martin's series. Please correct me if I'm wrong! (and hopefully I am) The problem start with TDD and Scrum stating that we should evolve the system implementing the requirements once they appear, avoiding upfront design. This make me work leaving all extensibility points open, (ab)using all kind of extensibility patterns all times. This has indeed a "dark side": adding complexity to the whole system. I don't know in advance if a certain part of my code would need to evolve further.

BUT, as correctly stated everywhere (and really often on JAA) you should add complexity only when needed. This IMHO carries to the conclusion that a decent up-front analysis should be made... conflicting with the rest of recipes...

Therefore the loop.... aaargh i hate circular dependencies!!!

Should we refactor things to reduce complexity after a feature is "confirmed"? Should we use the simplest way allowed and only if needed expand it? e.g. don't build super decoupled things when you don't need them yet?

(Any suggestion to improve the question style and content is welcome, i'm a newbie on stackoverflow)

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5 Answers 5

Should we refactor things to reduce complexity after a feature is "confirmed"? Should we use the simplest way allowed and only if needed expand it? e.g. don't build super decoupled things when you don't need them yet?

Yes. Although this is rather subjective, I dislike systems that have the flexibility to change every single thing there is to change, while you will not utilise all of those flexibilities. Your statement is contradictory though: Test Driven Development has taught me to "do the simplest thing that could possibly work".

If more functionality is needed, you can add tests, and then refactor and extend the code to make sure it does the thing you want it to do. Because you have tests in place, you can rest assured you won't break the currently existing code.

In short: don't build flexibility because you can. You should build flexibility because the situation dictates you to. I firmly believe that refactoring "on demand" makes the build time of your project shorter than having (unused) flexibility built in. With your tests in place, the refactoring "on demand" shouldn't take too long.

Shorter still: Keep It Simple, Stupid. ;)

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I believe there is a balance between making things simple and some deep architectural understanding of a system.

I try to separate short-term planning from long-term. In short-term planning I think just couple of steps ahead, if this feature will likely to be extended/modified/updated in the next iteration then I will try to make it ready for that. But if I don't foresee any extension, I will just follow KISS principle.

In long-term planning, I think at least half a year ahead. What will be the interactions, what is a possible roadmap? This gives me basic ideas of where I shall make things a little bit more advanced.

IMHO one should make informed decisions between planning and completing short-term goals.

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I suspect that experienced designers proceed with an element of intuition. There are "obvious" architectural decisions made, layering, separation of concerns design decisions kind of "drop out". The trick is to avoid analysis-paralysis and over-engineering.

As granularity increases, as we get closer to code, then "Your Not Going To Need It" mantra becomes more important - it's all too easy to get tied up in beautiful flexibility. But you can enable future flex by some simple approaches. For example expressing relationships between components in terms of (in Java) Interfaces. You may not go for a fully fledged abstract Factory Pattrern, but if the consumer is coded to an Interface it's pretty easy to introduce one. Similarly not scattering string literals around your code, but collecting them in one place, may greatly simplify future internatioanlisation or dynamic configuration, even if right now you don't need to externalise the strings.

The really good designers I see seem to play it almost like a game of Chess or Go, they anticipate future moves, but of course don't play the responses until they need to. (The Go term aji-keshi might be worth thinking about.)

Ha this is amusing: I looked up that aji-keshi reference to explain the term only to find that the author has applied the term to systems design addressing exactly this question!

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No doubt you should add code that does the simplest thing first - but the code that you add should adhere to SOLID principles.

Don't introduce the complexity (for e.g. design patterns, frameworks etc) just by speculating a change which can come in future.

Essential complexity of the problem which you are solving cannot be changed. This requires upfront thinking, brainstorming but Accidental complexity complexity gets added with speculation.

Regular peer code reviews help. If your peer can read and understand the code without raising eyebrows - then I think it should be fine..

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This make me work leaving all extensibility points open, (ab)using all kind of extenisibilty patterns all times. This has indeed a "dark side": adding complexity to the whole system. I don't know in advance if a certain part of my code would need to evolve further.

Should we use the simplest way allowed and only if needed expand it?

I think at least a piece of the conundrum can be solved by tweaking your definitions of "simplicity" and "complexity".

The JAA "recipes", SOLID principles, etc, are all shortcuts to managing coupling and cohesion in the design. If you define the "simplicity" of a design as the degree to which maximal cohesion and minimal coupling are achieved, then you could say that those principles and patterns aim to keep your design simple.

Therefore, by that definition, what you refer to as "extensibility points" are actually the result of keeping the design simple, and therefore not added complexity. Furthermore, whether they will be used in the future for the purpose of extension misses the point, as the purpose of a simple design is to facilitate future change.

The phrase, "do the simplest thing that could possibly work", refers more to the choice of what to build, and less the design of the code. For example, if you need to display an HTML page, build an HTML page, not a web application.

So, if you're following the definition of simplicity above in the way you maintain your design, and you only build the minimum to solve any given problem, your code base will be smaller, your design less complex, and your application will invite the changes required by future addition of features.

One final note: Pay attention to what your tests have to say about your design. Coupling and cohesion problems often manifest themselves as unwieldy test fixtures. When you see that, it's an indication that you've skipped some necessary refactoring steps.

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