Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some code that saves a many to many relationship in code. It was working fine with Entity Framework 4.1 but after updating to Entity Framework 5, it's failing.

I'm getting the following error:

The INSERT statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY constraint "FK_WebUserFavouriteEvent_Event". The conflict occurred in database "MainEvents", table "dbo.Event", column 'Id'.

I'm using POCO entities with custom mappings. Standard field and many-to-one relationship mappings seem to be working fine.

UPDATE

Ok, so I've got SQL Profiler installed and the plot has thickened...

exec sp_executesql N'insert [dbo].[WebUserFavouriteEvent]([WebUserId], [EventId])
values (@0, @1)
',N'@0 int,@1 int',@0=1820,@1=14

Which means:

WebUserId = @0 = 1820
EventId = @1 = 14

The interesting thing is is that EF5 seems to have flipped the foreign keys around... the WebUserId should be 14 and the EventId should be 1820, not the other way around like it is now.

I reviewed the mapping code and I'm 99% I've set it all up correctly. See Entity Framework Fluent API - Relationships MSDN article for more information.

NOTE: I have also found that this isn't restricted to saving either, SELECTs are also broken.

Here's all the relevant code:

Service Layer

public void AddFavEvent(WebUser webUser, Event @event)
{
    webUser.FavouriteEvents.Add(@event);

    _webUserRepo.Update(webUser);
}

Repository

public void Update<T>(params T[] entities)
    where T : DbTable
{
    foreach (var entity in entities)
    {
        entity.UpdatedOn = DateTime.UtcNow;
    }

    _dbContext.SaveChanges();
}

NOTE: I'm using a 1 DataContext per request approach, so webUser and @event would have been loaded from the same context as the one in the _webUserRepo.

Entities (don't worry about DbTable stuff)

public class Event : DbTable
{
    //BLAH
    public virtual ICollection<WebUser> FavouriteOf { get; set; }
    //BLAH
}

public class WebUser : DbTable
{
    //BLAH
    public virtual ICollection<Event> FavouriteEvents { get; set; }
    //BLAH
}

Mappings

public class EventMapping : DbTableMapping<Event>
{
    public EventMapping()
    {
        ToTable("Event");
        //BLAH
        HasMany(x => x.FavouriteOf)
            .WithMany(x => x.FavouriteEvents)
            .Map(x =>
                     {
                         x.MapLeftKey("EventId");
                         x.MapRightKey("WebUserId");
                         x.ToTable("WebUserFavouriteEvent");
                     });
    }
}

public class WebUserMapping : DbTableMapping<WebUser>
{
    public WebUserMapping ()
    {
        HasMany(x => x.FavouriteEvents)
            .WithMany(x => x.FavouriteOf)
            .Map(m =>
                     {
                         m.MapLeftKey("WebUserId");
                         m.MapRightKey("EventId");
                         m.ToTable("WebUserFavouriteEvent");
                     });
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I have confirmed that rolling back to EF 4.3.1 fixes the above problem. So it's definitely a breaking change in EF 5. –  Charlino Sep 2 '12 at 0:47
    
Doesn't "LeftKey" mean the left/first column in the join table, and doesn't "RightKey" mean the right/second column in the join table? From that perspective your mapping is contradicting: You map one and the same relationship, but in the first mapping your left column is called EventId and in the second the left column is called WebUserId. I would blame EF to not throw an exception in the first place about contradicting mapping, but apparently it just takes one of them and this one is different between the EF versions. Just get rid of one of the two mappings, you need only one. –  Slauma Sep 2 '12 at 18:53
    
@Slauma How is it contradicting? When I'm mapping from the perspective of an Event, the LeftKey should be the EventId... then when I'm mapping from the perspective of a WebUser the LeftKey should be the WebUserId. I would consider using the same value for the LeftKey (and RightKey for that matter) from both the Event and the WebUser perspective a contradiction... then I'd expect an exception. –  Charlino Sep 2 '12 at 19:24
    
You don't map properties to the join table, you specify column names. In your first mapping you say: I want a join table of name WebUserFavouriteEvent which has a first column of name EventId and a second column of name WebUserId. In your second mapping you say: I want a join table (with the same name) which has a first column of name WebUserId and a second column of name EventId. That's a contradiction. Do you want that your first column is called EventId or WebUserId? You cannot have both. –  Slauma Sep 2 '12 at 19:53
2  
This seems to be a bug to me. I have created a bug on the EF CodePlex site (entityframework.codeplex.com/workitem/488) and assigned it to one of the EF devs to investigate. –  Arthur Vickers Sep 6 '12 at 17:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+100

Looking at this I suspect that the problem might be caused by the fact that you map the same relationship twice. And you map it in different order.

I made a simple test where I first mapped the relationship once:

    class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Database.SetInitializer(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<Context>());
        var p = new Parent();
        var c = new Child();
        using (var db = new Context())
        {
            db.Parents.Add(new Parent());
            db.Parents.Add(p);

            db.Children.Add(c);
            db.SaveChanges();
        }

        using (var db = new Context())
        {
            var reloadedP = db.Parents.Find(p.ParentId);
            var reloadedC = db.Children.Find(c.ChildId);

            reloadedP.Children = new List<Child>();
            reloadedP.Children.Add(reloadedC);

            db.SaveChanges();
        }

        using (var db = new Context())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(db.Children.Count());
            Console.WriteLine(db.Children.Where(ch => ch.ChildId == c.ChildId).Select(ch => ch.Parents.Count).First());
            Console.WriteLine(db.Parents.Where(pa => pa.ParentId == p.ParentId).Select(pa => pa.Children.Count).First());
        }
    }
}

public class Parent
{
    public int ParentId { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Child> Children { get; set; }

}

public class Child
{
    public int ChildId { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Parent> Parents { get; set; }
}

public class Context : DbContext
{
    public Context() : base("data source=Mikael-PC;Integrated Security=SSPI;Initial Catalog=EFTest")
    {

    }

    public IDbSet<Child> Children { get; set; }
    public IDbSet<Parent> Parents { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Child>()
            .HasMany(x => x.Parents)
            .WithMany(x => x.Children)
            .Map(c =>
            {
                c.MapLeftKey("ChildId");
                c.MapRightKey("ParentId");
                c.ToTable("ChildToParentMapping"); 
            });

    }
}

And then I changed the OnModelCreating to be:

        protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Child>()
            .HasMany(x => x.Parents)
            .WithMany(x => x.Children)
            .Map(c =>
            {
                c.MapLeftKey("ChildId");
                c.MapRightKey("ParentId");
                c.ToTable("ChildToParentMapping"); 
            });

        modelBuilder.Entity<Parent>()
           .HasMany(x => x.Children)
           .WithMany(x => x.Parents)
           .Map(c =>
           {
               c.MapLeftKey("ParentId");
               c.MapRightKey("ChildId");
               c.ToTable("ChildToParentMapping");
           });
    }

What I found and suspected is that the first run generates this sql:

exec sp_executesql N'insert [dbo].[ChildToParentMapping]([ChildId], [ParentId])
values (@0, @1)
',N'@0 int,@1 int',@0=1,@1=2

In constrast to the second which generates:

exec sp_executesql N'insert [dbo].[ChildToParentMapping]([ParentId], [ChildId])
values (@0, @1)
',N'@0 int,@1 int',@0=1,@1=2

You see the values flipped? Here it actually count the ChildId column as ParentId. Now this doesn't crash for me but I let EF create the database which means it probably just switch the column names and if I would look at the foreign keys they would be switched too. If you created the database manually that probably won't be the case.

So in short: You mappings aren't equal and I expect one of them to be used and that one is probably wrong. In earlier verions I guess EF picked them up in different order.

UPDATE: I got a bit curios about the foreign keys and checked the sql.

From the first code:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ChildToParentMapping] ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_dbo.ChildToParentMapping_dbo.Children_ChildId] FOREIGN KEY ([ChildId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Children] ([ChildId]) ON DELETE CASCADE

And from the second code:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ChildToParentMapping] ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_dbo.ChildToParentMapping_dbo.Children_ParentId] FOREIGN KEY ([ParentId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Children] ([ChildId]) ON DELETE CASCADE

Now that is not nice. ParentId mapped against Children is certainly not what we want.

So is the second mapping wrong? Not really because see what happend when I removed the first one:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ChildToParentMapping] ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_dbo.ChildToParentMapping_dbo.Parents_ParentId] FOREIGN KEY ([ParentId]) REFERENCES [dbo].[Parents] ([ParentId]) ON DELETE CASCADE

Somehow having two mappings seems to mess things up. Bug or not I don't know.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I might have to experiment with this idea more. I still don't understand why mapping it twice would have this effect, mapping them twice in different orders is completely on purpose, doing it different wouldn't make sense. In short, if what you have found is the cause, I would view this as a bug in EF5. –  Charlino Sep 2 '12 at 17:27
1  
It seems like a bug to me. Not sure if you had time to see the update or not. But it seems like when there is two mappings EF get confused by the column names. If you create the database manually (Not with EF or with EF vOld) this would likely mean it's mapped incorrectly –  Mikael Eliasson Sep 2 '12 at 17:38
    
Very interesting, thank you so much for putting in the time and doing the research I should have done... definitely looks like you've found the trigger for this odd behaviour/bug. –  Charlino Sep 2 '12 at 17:48
    
You sir saved my life today. I had a double definition and had already lost two hours on that problem. I owe you a beer of whatever size you request. –  Maxime Rouiller Feb 1 '13 at 13:54
    
This was confusing me for several hours, thank you so much for the thorough explanation. Not sure if it's considered a "bug" but it certainly bugged me! instantrimshot.com –  mshubert12 Jul 23 '13 at 18:03

I can confirm this is a bug in EF5, although I'm still not sure how it worked in 4.3.1.

The problem is that we are not correctly associating the LeftKey/RightKey calls with their corresponding navigation properties.

I will file an EF6 bug over on our CodePlex project site.

To workaround, I think you will need to either:

  1. Configure the association from one side only. Or,
  2. Switch the LeftKey/RightKey columns names to be the same in both configurations.

Sorry for the inconvenience.

UPDATE: Here is the bug.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Andrew, appreciate the update from someone so close to the project! :-) I'm apprehensive to switch the LeftKey/RightKey columns to be the same in both configurations because I/we don't quite know how this bug manifests itself yet. I.e. if the bug happens because when EF finds the first mapping it stores the relationship in memory, then when it finds the second mapping it alters the keys for that relationship. If we were to flip the keys so they are the same, technically one of those mappings would be incorrect - the bug could appear again if EF comes across the wrong mapping first. –  Charlino Sep 7 '12 at 22:13
    
Then configuring the association only once is the way to go - And is actually the preferred way of using Code First as it's more DRY and also more efficient. –  Andrew Peters Sep 7 '12 at 23:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.