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  bool bSwitch  = true;
  double dSum = 1 + bSwitch?1:2;

So "dSum" is:

a)=1
b)=2
c)=3

The result is just rediculous and i got bashed for it...

I'm using VS2008 -> "Microsoft (R) 32-Bit C/C++-Optimierungscompiler Version 15.00.21022.08 für 80x86"

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2  
For the record, every C++ compiler will do the same. A rule of thumb: multiplication and division before addition and subtraction; everything else gets parens. –  Michael Burr Aug 30 '12 at 8:39
1  
Note to self: use as many parentheses as you can when dealing with the ternary operator. –  Matteo Italia Aug 30 '12 at 8:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

operator+ has higher precedence, than the ternary operator ?:.

So, this is equivalent to

double dSum = ( 1 + bSwitch ) ? 1 : 2;

Thus, you have dSum == 1.

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1  
Spasibo Kiril! Ja ponjal 4to oblagalsja ;-) –  realmelofan Aug 30 '12 at 9:12

A warning, obviously, but I use a true compiler:

void foo() {
  bool bSwitch  = true;
  double dSum = 1 + bSwitch?1:2;
}

gives:

$ clang++ -fsyntax-only test.cpp
test.cpp:3:28: warning: operator '?:' has lower precedence than '+'; '+' will be evaluated first [-Wparentheses]
  double dSum = 1 + bSwitch?1:2;
                ~~~~~~~~~~~^
test.cpp:3:28: note: place parentheses around the '+' expression to silence this warning
  double dSum = 1 + bSwitch?1:2;
                           ^
                (          )
test.cpp:3:28: note: place parentheses around the '?:' expression to evaluate it first
  double dSum = 1 + bSwitch?1:2;
                           ^
                    (          )
1 warning generated.

And yes, I gave en entire command line, it's on by default.

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I would expect 1., because the + operator takes precedence over the ternary operator. So the expression is read as

double dSum = (1 + bSwitch) ? 1:2;

and 1 + bSwitch is non-zero, so it evaluates as true.

See operator precedence.

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It's a precedence thing isn't it.

bool bSwitch  = true;
double dSum = (1 + bSwitch)?1:2;

dSum will be 1.0

Would have been easier to spot with sensible spacing around the operators.

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