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if i have reference type object, and i created two objects with the same attributes will they have the same hash code?

sample class:

class Person
{
   int id;
   string name;

   public Person(int pid, string pname)
   {
      this.id = pid;
      this.name = pname;
   }
}

then defining two objects:

Person p1 = new Person(1,"xxx");
Perdon p2 = new Person(1,"xxx");

//p1.GetHashCode() = p2.GetHashCode() ??

Edit:i tried this code and got differnt result but testing the thing on strings gave me the same result
that why i'm asking

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6  
Did you run this? What was the result? It would take far less time to test yourself than it did asking here. –  Oded Aug 30 '12 at 9:17
    
You do not want them to have the same hashcode. –  Henk Holterman Aug 30 '12 at 9:22
    
@Oded yor're right but i tried this on sa string and i got that same result then tried it on this class and got the same rsult that was confusing –  Star Aug 30 '12 at 9:24
4  
Then that's what you should be asking about... Don't ask about things that you can easily test - ask about what you are confused about or do not understand. –  Oded Aug 30 '12 at 9:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are responsible for implementing GetHashCode yourself. If you don't do that, they won't have the same hash code although they should.

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1  
"although they should" - I think they should not. Person is a mutable reference type. –  Henk Holterman Aug 30 '12 at 9:21
    
@HenkHolterman: I don't see any mutability here. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 30 '12 at 9:22
    
@Henk is right - the fields are not declared as readonly, so can be mutated. –  Oded Aug 30 '12 at 9:22
1  
The sample looks kind-of-immutable because it's most likely incomplete. –  Henk Holterman Aug 30 '12 at 9:24
1  
Besides, the OP obviously wants them to be "equal" if those two fields are the same. Implementing GetHashCode wouldn't be enough, he would also need to override Equals. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 30 '12 at 9:25

If Person is a struct, then the hashcode will be generated from the members value, and you'll get the same result. However, with a class, the default hashcode implementation will provide a unique hashcode for each object, based on their memory reference.

So in this case, if you want the same hashcode for p1 and p2, you'll have to provide your own implementation.

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2  
Probably one should add that they should indeed not get the same hash code, as the hash code should be different if the objects are not equal (in order to make hashes suitable for the purpose they are made for -- namely providing a good indication of equality), and p1.Equals (p2) == false if p1 and p2 are of class type, since the default concept of equality for class types is object identity. –  JohnB Aug 30 '12 at 9:22
1  
I'd recommend adding a GetHashCode() to it if it was a struct anyway. The code to produce reasonable default hashcodes for structs is pretty clever, but sadly that cleverness is a bit heavy. –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 10:52

see here for the default implementation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.gethashcode.aspx

The default implementation of the GetHashCode method does not guarantee unique return values for different objects. Furthermore, the .NET Framework does not guarantee the default implementation of the GetHashCode method, and the value it returns will be the same between different versions of the .NET Framework. Consequently, the default implementation of this method must not be used as a unique object identifier for hashing purposes.

But what I think you really want to know is how hash codes work.

Let's say you have the following class:

public Person
{
    private string name;
    public Person(Name name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Now, lets say you want to compare two Persons and check if they have the same name, how do you do this? You override the equals implemented in Object. (All classes in C# extend Object implicitly) Like so:

public Person
{
    private string name;
    public Person(Name name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        if(obj == null)
            return false // not equal if obj is null

        Equals temp = obj as Equals; // temp set to null if obj can not be cast to equals
        if(p == null)
            return false

        // if code gets here, the code object passed is an instance of Equals.
        // Now we have to check if the strings match.
        bool isEqual = p.name == this.name; // set if the two names match
        return isEqual; // return if these two match
    }
}

So now, you can check if two persons are equal. Example:

Person p1 = new Person("Jack");
Person p2 = new Person("Jack");
Person p3 = new Person("Jill");
Object p4 = new Person("Jill");

p1.Equals(p2) // returns true
p1.Equals(p3) // returns false
p4.Equals(p1) // returns false
p4.Equals(p3) // returns true

Now, lets say that you had a huge list of Persons, like, a million, and you'd like to know if the person named "amy" exists in this list. How would you find this person? Would you loop over all the names one by one and check if that Person equals amy? But that would be very slow, what if amy was the millionth person in this list? How do we improve performance?

Enter Hashcodes.

Let's say you write a simple hashcode algorithm: The hashcode is the sum of each number of each letter in the persons name.

public Person
{
    private string name;
    public Person(Name name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public  override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        if(obj == null)
            return false // not equal if obj is null

        Equals temp = obj as Equals; // temp set to null if obj can not be cast to equals
        if(p == null)
            return false

        // if code gets here, the code object passed is an instance of Equals.
        // Now we have to check if the strings match.
        bool isEqual = p.name == this.name; // set if the two names match
        return isEqual; // return if these two match
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int sum = 0;
        foreach(char c in this.name)
        {
            sum += c;
        }
        return sum;
    }
}

So if we have amy her hashcode would be 1 + 13 + 25, so 38.

Now instead of a normal list, you have a list with so called 'buckets'. Your hashcode decides in which bucket you go. amy has a hascode if 38 she goes in bucket 38.

Now let's say we have another person, names may, she has the same letters in her name so her hashcode is also 38, she also goes into bucket 38

Now, whenever you want to check if amy exists in this list. We first check her hashcode, which 38, now we go look in bucket 38, and loop over all the objects in bucket 38 we check if any of the objects in bucket 38 match amy, if true, return true, if false, return false. So if you have a million Persons, the list of checks you must do to know if amy exists in this list is drastically reduced.

So basically if you're gonna use hashcodes you're gonna have to abide to the following rules:

  • You have to override & implement equals if you're gonna use hashcodes.
  • The for two objects where Equals returns true, they must always have the same hashcode
  • Two objects that are different may have the same hashcode, but not necessarily have to be the same.

That's basically the gist of it.

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Nice long answer but it doesn't really focus on the core question : what is the default behaviour . –  Henk Holterman Aug 30 '12 at 13:10
    
@HenkHolterman I guess you're right, but I try t_t. edits answer. But I think I answered the question he wanted to ask, because his question made it look like he doesn't know what hashcodes are. –  ProgrammerAtWork Aug 30 '12 at 13:24

By default they will not (for a reference type). You can try this and see.

If you want them to have the same hash code, you must write your own GetHashCode() accordingly.

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