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I am trying to replace version range 1.6,1.7 with 1.7,1.8 as below.

sed -i 's/version\>[1.6,1.7)/version\>[1.7,1.8)/g'

I have tried escaping [,),. etc. but it is not still matching [1.6,1.7)

What am I missing?

This is the full command I run to replace versions:

find . -iname 'pom.xml' -print -exec sed -i 's/version\>\[1.6,1.7)/version\>[1.7,1.8)/g' {} \;

GNU sed version 4.1.5

Linux ** 2.6.18-238 #1 SMP Fri Oct 28 08:42:39 PDT 2011 x86_64

UPDATE:

sed -i 's/version\>.*1.6,1.7)/version\>[1.7,1.8)/g' 

worked for me. But that is still too generic.

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please edit your post to include output of sed --version and uname . Good luck. –  shellter Aug 30 '12 at 9:43
    
@shellter - done. –  Fakrudeen Aug 30 '12 at 10:36
    
What do you mean by it's too generic? Please post an example of the line that you want sed to edit, and perhaps lines you do not want sed to change. –  Thor Aug 30 '12 at 13:43
    
@Thor - I avoided the issue by using .* –  Fakrudeen Nov 6 '13 at 9:43

1 Answer 1

I do not fully understand. What string are you trying to match? If it is version>[1.6,1.7), this substitution should work:

s/version>\[1\.6,1\.7)/version>[1.7,1.8)/g

There is no need to escape the >, but you should escape [ and dots because they have a special meaning.

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That's not correct - I know for a fact you need to escape >. The problem is in [ character. –  Fakrudeen Aug 30 '12 at 9:23
    
@Fakrudeen: I tested my code before posting. –  choroba Aug 30 '12 at 9:24
    
Sorry - I forgot to mention I run this in shell. > is the redirection operator, so I have to escape. –  Fakrudeen Aug 30 '12 at 9:26
    
@Fakrudeen: No. The single quotes around the expression prevent the shell from interpreting >. –  choroba Aug 30 '12 at 9:27
    
yes - you are right - But that is not the problem. It still matches version> correctly. See my edit in the post about working one. It is something to do with [ –  Fakrudeen Aug 30 '12 at 9:32

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