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I'm building my first web app with .net, and it needs to interact with a very large existing database. I have the connection set up, and have made a class that I can call to build select, insert, update and delete queries passing in several parameters.

I can connect by writing the query I want in the button click, but I want to know is this the best solution? It seems hard to debug this way, as it is mixing the database code with other code.

In the past (in other languages) I have created a class which would contain all of the database query strings and parameters which would be called by the rest of the code. That way if something simple like the stored procedure parameters change, the code is all in one place.

When I look for this in .net, I see nothing about doing it this way and I'm keen to learn the best practices.

    protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
       NameLabel.Text = UserNoTextBox.Text;

       string spName = "SP_SelectUser";
       SqlParameter[] parameters = new SqlParameter[]
       {
           new SqlParameter("@User_No", UserNoTextBox.Text)
       };

       DataAccess dbAccess = new DataAccess();

       DataTable retVal = dbAccess.ExecuteParamerizedSelectCommand(spName, CommandType.StoredProcedure, parameters);
 }

Update: The class I was referring to was the DataAccess class from the following website: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/361579/A-Beginners-Tutorial-for-Understanding-ADO-NET (Class available at http://www.codeproject.com/script/Articles/ViewDownloads.aspx?aid=361579)

Update: In the end I opted for using MVC 3 with Entity Framework - it's great!

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1  
Have you tried Entities Framework, LinqToSql, DataTables? –  Dima Aug 30 '12 at 9:48
    
You shouldn't have your UI calling code that talks directly to the database. Take a look at Entity Framework and the MVVM design model. –  PhonicUK Aug 30 '12 at 9:59
1  
The problem here is that there is no concise way of answering such a huge question - data access and best practice are both big topics, no matter how you look at them - and there is no single "one way" to do things. The one thing I will say, though, is that most people would agree that DataTable is very far from "best practice" –  Marc Gravell Aug 30 '12 at 10:02
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a huge topic, but a very brief view might be as follows:

  1. DataTable must die (ok, it has a few uses, but in general: it must die); consider using a custom type such as:

    public class User {
        public int Id {get;set;}
        public string Name {get;set;}
        public string EmployeeNumber {get;set;}
        // etc
    }
    

    It should also be noted that many ORM tools will generate these for you from the underlying table structure.

  2. don't mix UI and data access; separate this code, ideally into separate classes, but at the minimum into separate methods:

    protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        NameLabel.Text = UserNoTextBox.Text;
        var user = SomeType.GetUser(UserNoTextBox.Text);
        // do something with user
    }
    ...
    public User GetUser(string userNumber) {
       ... your DB code here
    }
    
  3. use a library such as an ORM (EF, LINQ-to-SQL, LLBLGenPro) or a micro-ORM (dapper, PetaPoco, etc) - for example, here's that code with dapper:

    public User GetUser(string userNumber) {
        using(var conn = GetOpenConnection()) {
            return conn.Query<User>("SP_SelectUser",
            new {User_No = userNumber}, // <=== parameters made simple
            commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).FirstOrDefault()
        }
    }
    

    or with LINQ-to-SQL (EF is very similar):

    public User GetUser(string userNumber) {
        using(var db = GetDataContext()) {
            return db.Users.FirstOrDefault(u => u.User_No == userNumber);
        }
     }
    
  4. not everything needs to be a stored procedure; there used to be a huge performance difference between the two - but that is no longer the case. There are valid reasons to use them (very granular security, shared DB with multiple application consumers, a dba who thinks they are a developer), but they also create maintenance problems, especially when deploying changes. In most cases I would not hesitate to use raw (but parameterized) SQL, for example:

    public User GetUser(string userNumber) {
        using(var conn = GetOpenConnection()) {
            return conn.Query<User>(@"
    select [some columns here]
    from Users where User_No = @userNumber",
            new {userNumber}).FirstOrDefault()
        }
    }
    
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Thanks, that was very well explained. –  Carrie Hall Aug 30 '12 at 10:38
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I would do something like this:

code behind

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    UserController uc = new UserController();
    User u = UserController.GetUser(Convert.ToInt32(UserNoTextBox.Text);
    NameLabel.Text = u.UserName;
}

And in your UserController.cs

class UserController{
    public User GetUser(int userId)
    {
        return DataAccess.GetUser(userId);
    }
}

And in your User.cs

class User{
    private string _userName;
    public string UserName{ get{ return _userName;} set{ _userName= value;} }
}

And in your DataAccess.cs using Dapper

public User GetUser(int id)
{
    var user = cnn.Query<User>("SP_SelectUser", new {User_No = id}, 
        commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).First();
    return user;
}     

This is just one option, but you can also use different ORM's It is about personal flavor. Here is a list of .Net ORM's

Good luck!

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General best practices tend to be language agnostic in the OOP world. You say you have worked with data access in other OOP languages in the past, so would do exactly the same in .net. See response from @Oded for good links for general best practices.

If you are looking for guidance on how best to use .net's data access technology, try MSDN's articles on ADO as a starting point.

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What you are doing will work, but doesn't follow good OOP principles, one of which is separation of concerns - your UI shouldn't be talking to the database directly.

You should have all your data access code placed in a separate layer which your UI layer can call.

Also see the SOLID principles and Don't repeat yourself.


When interacting with the database, many people use an ORM - Entity Framework, nHibernate, Dapper and many others exist for .NET applications. These act as a data access layer and you should investigate their usage for your application.

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