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While determining the impact of various bug fixes, I often find myself trying to find all the routes through the codebase which can end up in my changed code. This is a tedious manual process, involving lots of clicking on method names in Eclipse and searching for 'References...' while I draw a tree structure of calls in my notepad.

This seems like it should be automatable, but whenever I search for such tools I fail to find such a thing. There seem to be tools which will analyse code for bugs, race-conditions, etc (FindBugs, PMD, Checkstyle, for example) but nothing which will simply output potential routes through the code. It's quite possible I'm not using the correct search terms.

Does such a tool exist for Java or I have overlooked a key reason why this is not possible?

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Note that profiling usually means analyzing a running program. What you're asking is a subset of static analysis (i.e. finding out stuff about a program simply by "looking at it" instead of "running it and seeing what happens"). That might have been a reason why you didn't find the phrase "Call Hierarchy" in your research. – Joachim Sauer Aug 30 '12 at 9:58
Thanks Joachim. I sort of knew that, but was clutching-at-straws for the nearest term I could find. – Disco 3 Aug 30 '12 at 10:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe you are looking for a call hierarchy. It is built in Eclipse, IntelliJ and Netbeans.

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Open Call Hierarchy is Ctrl+Alt+H in Eclipse (at least on Windows). – Joachim Sauer Aug 30 '12 at 9:56
That's it! I knew there had to be something. Thanks. – Disco 3 Aug 30 '12 at 10:00

Isn't the "Open Call Hierarchy" Command what you are searching for?

To use this select a method, field, constructor, etc. and select "Open Call Hierarchy". Here you are able to browse through the places where your code references the selected element.

There is a shortcut, too: Ctrl+Alt+H

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