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From my understanding, the performance of the tcp protocol is limited by RTT (round trip time). If a client sends a message to a server, it needs to wait for a confirmation response before it can send the next message in the sequence. This means if I'm on a link with 250ms RTT, I am limited to 4 messages per second which is quite slow for many applications and severely hampers data transfer rate.

What are some ways to work around this limitation?

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closed as not constructive by EJP, jonsca, andrewsi, Jack, Bryan Crosby Aug 31 '12 at 16:13

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3 Answers 3

If a client sends a message to a server, it needs to wait for a confirmation response before it can send the next message in the sequence.

That's not correct. There are such things as delayed and selective ACKs.

This means if I'm on a link with 250ms RTT, I am limited to 4 messages per second.

No it doesn't.

The actual bottleneck is the bandwidth-delay product of the link. Make sure that your socket send and receive buffers at both ends are at least equal to this product.

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What is ACK? How does TCP gauranty delivery in sequence without providing confirmation for each message sent then? –  user788171 Aug 30 '12 at 10:37
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@user788171 If you don't even know what ACK is, then I suggest you read up more on the Transmission Control Protocol and how it works. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 30 '12 at 10:43
    
@user788171 Instead of deciding you have a problem, and exactly where it is, and looking for ways to implement your solution, I suggest you first identify whether you even have a problem that needs fixing. Test and measure. You don't appear to know the first thing about TCP. It is considerably more intelligent and finely-tuned that you are giving it credit for. –  EJP Aug 30 '12 at 13:16

The RTT just tells you about a ~250ms latency for packets to be evicted from the send buffer. Given the send buffers are large enough there is nothing that stops you from bidirectional communication at maximum bandwidth minus protocol overhead.

If you don't need error correction (that is you message is worth nothing when it arrives too late) consider using UDP.

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@Downvoter Please explain your aversion to this correct answer. –  EJP Aug 30 '12 at 13:14

If I understand correctly. Your protocol will wait response message from peer, before it can send the next request message. In that case RTT limits speed as you say (4 messages per second).

If specification of your protocol request that kind of waitings, then the protocol has bad design.

If not, then you may improve performance by sending several messages to peer, before waiting response messages. In that way high RTT won't cause so bad slownesss.

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