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In the python tutorial is an example (copied below), shouldn't else be indented? I ran the code and it didn't work but I indented it (else) and it worked. Is, what I am saying right? If the documentation is wrong, then how do I report it as a bug to python doc guys?

>>> for n in range(2, 10):
...     for x in range(2, n):
...         if n % x == 0:
...             print n, 'equals', x, '*', n/x
...             break
...     else:
...         # loop fell through without finding a factor
...         print n, 'is a prime number'
...
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3  
Nope, because a for loop can have an else suite as well. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 30 '12 at 10:38
1  
this construct made it into the 'Strangest language feature' question some time ago (see stackoverflow.com/a/3690698/288875) –  Andre Holzner Aug 30 '12 at 10:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Tha example is working and the indented is fine, have a look here:

                                                    # Ident level:
>>> for n in range(2, 10):                          # 0 
...     for x in range(2, n):                       # 1                          
...         if n % x == 0:                          # 2
...             print n, 'equals', x, '*', n/x      # 3
...             break                               # 3
...     else:                                       # 1
...         # loop fell through without finding a factor                        
...         print n, 'is a prime number'            # 2

As you can see, the else relates to the second for by following this rule:

Loop statements may have an else clause; it is executed when the loop terminates through exhaustion of the list (with for) or when the condition becomes false (with while), but not when the loop is terminated by a break statement.

In the example, it means that the else will be called if the second for (in the second line) will finish running but will never run the break command - only if n % x == 0 never eval to TRUE.

If (n % x == 0) at any point the break will be called the second for will stop, n from the first for will grow by 1, (n = n + 1) and the second for will be called again with a new n.

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See docs you linked:

Loop statements may have an else clause; it is executed when the loop 
terminates through exhaustion of the list (with for) or when the condition 
becomes false (with while), but not when the loop is terminated by a break 
statement. This is exemplified by the following loop, which searches for 
prime numbers:
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This is an example of Python's for ... else http://psung.blogspot.co.il/2007/12/for-else-in-python.html

It basically invokes the code in the else part after the for loop is over and terminated normally (not broke, in any way)

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