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I'm trying to make a dynamic type that basically wraps some methods on a static class. I've created a static method called Wrap that has a generic parameter which should be an interface, and one normal parameter which is the type of class that has the static methods.

e.g.

IInterfaceTest obj = StaticInterface.Wrap<IInterfaceTest>(typeof(StaticClassNameHere));
obj.TestInterfaceMethod();

But the code I'm generating is obviously broken somewhere as I get an InvalidProgramException when I call the method.

I based my code on the ILDasm output of a test class I made, and as far as I can tell, I'm outputting the same code. But it ain't working...

public static class StaticInterface
{
    private static AssemblyBuilder _asm = null;
    private static ModuleBuilder _mod = null;
    private static Type _thisType = typeof(StaticInterface);
    private static int _count = 0;
    public static T Wrap<T>(Type type)
    {
      ILGenerator ilgen;

      if (_asm == null)
      {
         _asm = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.DefineDynamicAssembly(new System.Reflection.AssemblyName(_thisType.Name), AssemblyBuilderAccess.Run);
         _mod = _asm.DefineDynamicModule(_thisType.Name);
      }

      string newTypeName = _thisType.Name + "._" + _count++;

      TypeBuilder typBuilder = _mod.DefineType(newTypeName, System.Reflection.TypeAttributes.Class | System.Reflection.TypeAttributes.Public);
      typBuilder.AddInterfaceImplementation(typeof(T));

      ConstructorBuilder conBuilder = typBuilder.DefineDefaultConstructor(System.Reflection.MethodAttributes.Public);

      foreach (MethodInfo method in typeof(T).GetMethods())
      {
         ParameterInfo[] parameters = method.GetParameters();
         Type[] paramTypes = new Type[parameters.Length];

         for (int j = 0; j < parameters.Length; j++)
         {
            paramTypes[j] = parameters[j].ParameterType;
         }

         MethodBuilder mth = typBuilder.DefineMethod(method.Name,
            MethodAttributes.Public | MethodAttributes.Virtual | MethodAttributes.HideBySig | MethodAttributes.NewSlot | MethodAttributes.Final,
                        method.ReturnType,
                        paramTypes);

          ilgen = mth.GetILGenerator();
          ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Nop);

          for (short j = 0; j < parameters.Length; j++)
          {
             ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg, j + 1);
          }

          MethodInfo callMeth = type.GetMethod(method.Name, BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static, null, paramTypes, null);

          ilgen.EmitCall(OpCodes.Call, callMeth, null);

          if (method.ReturnType != null && method.ReturnType != typeof(void))
          {
             ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Stloc_0);
             Label end = ilgen.DefineLabel();
             ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Br_S, end);

             ilgen.MarkLabel(end);
             ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldloc_0);
          }

          ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
       }

       typBuilder.CreateType();

       return (T)_asm.CreateInstance(newTypeName, false, BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance, null, null, null, null);
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can we see the method that you are calling/wrapping? i.e. can you make this a complete (runnable, but minimal) example? Unfortunately, the exact context is very important when understanding emit. –  Marc Gravell Aug 30 '12 at 11:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Mainly, I think it relates to your handling of return types:

ilgen.EmitCall(OpCodes.Call, callMeth, null);
if (method.ReturnType != null && method.ReturnType != typeof(void))
{
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Stloc_0);
    Label end = ilgen.DefineLabel();
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Br_S, end);

    ilgen.MarkLabel(end);
    ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldloc_0);
}
ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
  • you haven't defined any locals, so Stloc_0 and Ldloc_0 are illegal
  • the branch just... branches to the next line (so does nothing), so this is basically "store into X, load from X", which is a no-op if we don't care about the side-effect of assigning X
  • this is completely unnecessary anyway - just leave the return value on the stack, since it needs to match (meaning: if the method doesn't return a value, then that's fine; if it does return a value, then that value is already the value on the stack - i.e. exactly what we want)

So the simpler (and working) implementation is just:

ilgen.EmitCall(OpCodes.Call, callMeth, null);
ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
share|improve this answer
    
First off, thanks! But... I understand what you're saying with the branch, I only added it as the ILDasm of my test class was doing the same, I realise it shouldn't affect anything. But you also say the Stloc_0 and Ldloc_0 are invalid? My test class ILDasm does the exact same, I assumed these referred to the return value of the method call? –  MadSkunk Aug 30 '12 at 11:35
    
Hmmm... well thanks again. I've just tried removing the whole return type part, as you suggest and it works! Still don't understand why the dissassembly of my test class was so weird in comparison then... –  MadSkunk Aug 30 '12 at 11:39
1  
@MadSkunk because you compiled it in debug mode ;p Never do that if you want to look at the IL - always build in release mode if you are planning that. –  Marc Gravell Aug 30 '12 at 11:43
2  
@MadSkunk if you look in your test class (in ILDASM / reflector), I bet it also declares a local at the start of the IL block. –  Marc Gravell Aug 30 '12 at 11:43
    
Bugger... You're right, thanks. Lesson learnt! –  MadSkunk Aug 30 '12 at 15:07

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