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ok I do have the code below

<?php
    class foo{
       public $bar = NULL;

       public function boo(){
          $this->bar();
       }
    }

    $mee = new foo();

    //save a closure function on the property
    $mee->bar = function(){
        echo 'hahaha';
    };

    //invoke the closure function by using a class method
    $mee->boo();
?>

and you can see it running here http://codepad.org/s1jhi7cv

now what i want here is to store the closure function on the class method.

well closures are possible as i read the documentation about it here http://php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php

is this possible? did i went to something wrong? please correct me

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You shouldn't use "codepad.org" for this, they are using a pretty old version of PHP that does not yet support closures. –  Niko Aug 30 '12 at 12:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your example code at codepad.org does not work because codepad.org uses PHP 5.2.5, and closure support was only added in 5.3.

However, your code will also not work in a PHP version that supports closures, although you will get a different error: http://codepad.viper-7.com/Ob0bH5

This is a limitation of PHP at present. $obj->member() looks for a method named member and will not look at properties to see if they are callable. It is, frankly, annoying.

The only way I am aware of to make this work without call_user_func()/call_user_func_array() is:

public function boo() {
   $func = $this->bar;
   $func();
}
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seems not running.. codepad.org/AUkcKHPC –  Mahan Aug 30 '12 at 12:15
2  
@Mahan It won't work on codepad.org (see edit above), you need at least 5.3. Works here –  DaveRandom Aug 30 '12 at 12:17
    
worked like a charm thanks =) –  Mahan Aug 30 '12 at 12:27

You need to exploit some magic functionality of PHP (__call) to make use of that. Extend from Extendable for example:

class Extendable {
    static function import($context) {
        $self = new static();
        while (is_callable($context)) $context = $context($self);
        if (is_array($context) || is_object($context) || is_a($context, 'Traversable')) {
            foreach($context as $key => $value)
                $self->$key = &$value; # preserve keys if
        }
        return $self;
    }
    public function __call($name, $args) {
        if (isset($this->$name) && is_callable($this->$name)) {
            return call_user_func_array($this->$name, $args);
        }
        throw new BadFunctionCallException(sprintf('Undefined function %s.', $name));
    }
}

And you can do the job. It's not that nice. Background and examples are in one of my blog posts:

You can naturally implement that magic functionality your own, too.

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Nice, could easily be turned into a trait as well if you want to extend some other base class with this functionality. –  DaveRandom Aug 30 '12 at 12:22
    
Yeah, true. However I do not know if using traits for magic function is not calling for trouble in the first place ;) –  hakre Aug 30 '12 at 12:28
    
+1. I would throw BadMethodCallException instead, though. –  drrcknlsn Aug 30 '12 at 12:30
    
Yeh I thought exactly that after I wrote the comment. Although I little of the danger is taken out because a trait method can still be overridden, but that breaks the whole purpose of the trait. Meh. –  DaveRandom Aug 30 '12 at 12:34
    
@drrcknlsn: Or maybe an UnexpectedValueException. These exception names are a mess in PHP :I) –  hakre Aug 30 '12 at 12:35

You will not be able to do that.

Take for example this code:

class T {
  function foo() {
    echo 'T::foo';
  }
}

$t = new T;
$t->foo = function() {
  echo 'Closure::foo';
};
$t->foo();

It works fine on PHP 5.4.6 and/or PHP 5.3.16, however it will result in T::foo getting printed.

This happens because methods, in PHP, are not modifiable class properties, as they are for example in javascript.

However,

$foo = $t->foo;
$foo();

will print Closure::foo as expected.

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PHP is not a prototype based language hence you cannot redefine functions

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Use __call to catch all non-defined methods and then look up the closure and invoke it. Take a look at my post on this SitePoint thread.

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can you give an example code please? sorry i don't have experience using __call thank you –  Mahan Aug 30 '12 at 12:13
    
@Mahan see edit with thread link. –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 30 '12 at 12:15
    
An exemplary __call function you can find in my answer as well. –  hakre Aug 30 '12 at 12:20

Use call_user_func() function:

<?php
    class foo{
       public $bar = NULL;

       public function boo(){
          call_user_func($this->bar);
       }
    }

    $mee = new foo();

    //save a closure function on the property
    $mee->bar = function(){
        echo 'hahaha';
    };

    //invoke the closure function by using a class method
    $mee->boo();

This will display "ahahah"

Hope it helps.

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