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I did find a way to capitalize the whole document, with both sed and awk, but how to do it, if I want to convert everything inside patterns from CAPS LOCK to Capital?

For example, I have an HTML file, and everything (multiple occurrences) between <b> and </b> has to be converted from TITLE to Title, and if possible making small words (1 ~ 2 letters) in lowercase.

From This:

<div id="1">
<div class="p"><b>THIS IS A RANDOM TITLE</b></div>
<table class="hugetable">
...
</table>
<div class="p"><b>THIS IS ANOTHER RANDOM TITLE</b></div>
<table class="hugetable">
...
</table>
...
</div>

To this:

<div id="1">
<div class="p"><b>This is a Random Title</b></div>
<table class="hugetable">
...
</table>
<div class="p"><b>This is Another Random Title</b></div>
<table class="hugetable">
...
</table>
...
</div>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not the most beautiful solution but I think it works:

sed -r -e '/<b>/ {s/( .)([^ ]*)/\1\L\2/g}' -e 's/<b>(.)/<b>\u\1/' -e '/<b>/ {s/(\b.{1,2}\b)/\L\1/g}' data

Explanation:

  • 1st expression (-e): If a line contains <b>:
    • Then for each word which has a space in front of it, keep the space and the first (already capitalized) character (\1) and then convert all the following characters of the word to lower case (\L\2)
  • 2nd expression (-e): The first word after <b> is still uncapitalized, so select the first character after the bold tag <b>(.) and replace it uppercased <b>\u\1
  • 3rd expression (-e): Again if a line contains <b>:
    • Then select words of 1 or 2 characters in length \b.{1,2}\b and replace them lowercased \L\1
share|improve this answer
    
It really works, but what about the small words, for example "a", "an", "of" (util 2 characters), any way of making sed ignore them? –  ghaschel Aug 30 '12 at 13:20
1  
@ghaschel it is not getting any prettier, but I added the decapitalization of 1/2-character words. –  Sicco Aug 30 '12 at 13:26
    
it doesn't need to be preety. It works perfectly. Thank you! –  ghaschel Aug 30 '12 at 13:28

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