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I know what is the meaning of PECS.

Producer Extends,Consumer Super.

the thing is how would I know if its a consumer or producer?

Also does this code follow the "PECS"

public class Tree<T> {

    //List of branches for this tree
    private List<Tree<? super T>> branch = new ArrayList<Tree<? super T>>();
    public Tree(T t){ this.t = t; }
    public void addBranch(Tree< ? super T> src){ branch.add(src); }
    public Tree<? extends T> getBranch(int branchNum){
        return (Tree<? extends T>) branch.get(branchNum);
    }
    private T t;
}
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A Tree is usually more than just a wrapper for an ArrayList. –  poitroae Aug 30 '12 at 13:15
    
This is only an example I could think of. –  KyelJmD Aug 30 '12 at 13:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A nice mnemonic you can use is to imagine returns for extends and accepts for super.

So a Tree<? extends T> reads Tree<? returns T>, which means that you can call the methods in Tree that return T, but not the methods that accept T as an argument type.

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I am kinda confused, but with regards with the code. Did I did it right? –  KyelJmD Aug 30 '12 at 13:24
    
In the code you show there are no invocations made on the Tree argument. Put Tree<T> everywhere, I think that's the only appropriate way for your case. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 30 '12 at 13:55
    
in order for my code to comply with the PECS should I declare Tree<T> as Tree<? extends T> ? –  KyelJmD Aug 30 '12 at 14:05
    
With PECS it's simple: if you don't comply with it, the compiler won't let you call some methods. If it's alright with the compiler, then you don't have to worry about anything else. BTW you can't declare the class with a wildcard. That's only used for variable/parameter types. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 30 '12 at 14:08
1  
Yes, that's right. You cannot use type bounds with new. It's only legal, as I said, in variable/parameter type declaration. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 30 '12 at 15:25
  • Producer refers to the return type of a method.
  • Consumer refers to the parameter type of a method.
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