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I have a program that I need to execute at certain intervals. For instance, I may want it to execute it every five minutes. I have several coordinators that communicate with several end nodes devices. The code below is on the coordinators. I need it so that if the interval is set to 5 then it runs and records information at for example: 9:05, 9:10, 9:15, 9:20, 9:25 and etc. The code I have so far is as follows:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    while True:
        try:
            r = json.read(rqst_command())
            interval = r.get('intvl')
            collect_time = r.get('c_time')
            command = r.get('cmd')
            send_stats(cmd_nodes(command, collect_time))
            time.sleep(interval)
        except Exception, e:
            print e
            print "**Top Level Exception"
            pass

The problem is that if I set the interval to 5 minutes it does not record exactly every 5 minutes. The execution time seems to slowly increase that time. So for example the above code may record as 9:05:09, 9:10:19, 9:15:29, 9:20:41, 9:25:50. The time it takes for the program to run depends on how fast the nodes communicate back.

Does anybody have any ideas on how I can change my code so that the program will execute exactly every 5 minutes?

EDIT/UPDATE

I think I have figured out a way to handle my problem. I grab the current datetime and then check to see if it is on the 5 minute mark. If it is then record the datetime and send it to the send_stats function. That way the datetime will always be exactly what I want it to be. If it is not on the 5 minute mark then sleep for awhile and then check again. I have the code mostly completed. However, I am getting the following error when I run the program: 'builtin_function_or_method' object has no attribute 'year'.

What am I doing incorrectly?

Here is my new code:

import os
import json
import datetime
from datetime import datetime
import urllib2
from urllib import urlencode
from socket import *
import time
import zigbee
import select

if __name__ == '__main__':
        while True:
            try:
                r = json.read(rqst_command())
                interval = r.get('intvl')
                collect_time = r.get('c_time')
                command = r.get('cmd')

                tempTest = True

                while tempTest == True:
                    start_time = datetime.now
                    compare_time = datetime(start_time.year, start_time.month, start_time.day, start_time.hour, 0, 0)
                    difff = int((start_time - compare_time).total_seconds() / 60)

                    if((difff % interval) == 0):
                        c_t = datetime(start_time.year, start_time.month, start_time.day, start_time.hour, start_time.minute, 0)
                        send_stats(cmd_nodes(command, collect_time), c_t)
                        tempTest = False
                    else:
                        time.sleep(30)              
            except Exception, e:
                print e
                print "**Top Level Exception"
                pass
share|improve this question
5  
Have you considered using a task scheduler like cron ? –  SirDarius Aug 30 '12 at 13:51
    
Wouldn't it be easier to handle on an OS level, like setting a cron job? EDIT: SirDarius beat me to it! –  David B Aug 30 '12 at 13:51
    
The coordinator that runs the program is actually a Digi ConenctPort X4. I don't think cron is an option. –  Linger Aug 30 '12 at 17:54
    
You have to show us the full traceback, please. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke Aug 31 '12 at 15:43
    
How do I get the full traceback? I am using notepad++ to edit the python and running it on hardware the has pyhton imbedded. –  Linger Aug 31 '12 at 15:52

7 Answers 7

As others have pointed out, there already are ready-to-use job/task schedulers like cron. You can just use them. But you could also implement your own simple solution in Python, which would be fine. You just have to do it the right way. The fundamental problem in your approach is that you sleep for a certain interval between actions and do not regularly check the system time. In your method, the duration of the action is the error of your time measurement. And this error sums up with each action. You need to have a time reference that is free of this error, which is the system time.

Implementation example: Consider, for instance, one second precision is good enough for you. Then check the system time each second within a loop. This you can safely realize with a time.sleep(1). If the system time is e.g. 5 minutes later than the last_action_execution_time (which you have obviously stored somewhere), store the current time as last_action_execution_time and execute the action. As long as this action for sure lasts less then 5 minutes, the next execution will happen at last_action_execution_time + 5 min with only a very small error. Most importantly, this error does not grow during runtime with the number of executions.

For a rock-solid Python-based solution you should also look at http://docs.python.org/library/sched.html.

share|improve this answer

how about:

while true:
    try:

        start=time.time() # save the beginning time before execution starts

        r = json.read(rqst_command())
        interval = r.get('intvl')
        collect_time = r.get('c_time')
        command = r.get('cmd')
        start_time = datetime.now()
        send_stats(cmd_nodes(command, collect_time))
        end_time = datetime.now()
        sleepy_time = interval - (end_time - start_time)

        while time.time() <= start + sleepy_time*60: #To wait until interval has ended note: I'm assuming sleepy_time is in minutes.
            pass

    except Exception, e:
    print e
    print "**Top Level Exception"
    pass
share|improve this answer
    
+1, close to what I need, but not quite there. –  Linger Sep 1 '12 at 1:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The below code is what ended up solving my problem. Now no matter what the interval is, it will always use the datetime starting at the beginning of each hour and incrementing by the interval. So, if the interval is 5 then the datetime shows up as for instance: 9:00:00, 9:05:00, 9:10:00, 9:15:00, 9:20:00, 9:25:00, and etc. If the interval is 3 then the datetime shows up as for instance: 5:00:00, 5:03:00, 5:06:00, 5:09:00, 5:12:00, 5:15:00, and etc. The coordinator gets the data from the end nodes and then sends the data to a remote server along with the datetime.

if __name__ == '__main__':
    last_minute = -1

    while True:
        try:
            r = json.read(rqst_command())
            print r
            command = r.get('cmd')
            interval = r.get('intvl')
            collect_time = r.get('c_time')

            tempTest = True

            while tempTest == True:
                start_time = datetime.now()
                s_minute = start_time.minute

                if(((s_minute % interval) == 0) and (s_minute != last_minute)):
                    tempTest = False
                    c_t = datetime(start_time.year, start_time.month, start_time.day, start_time.hour, start_time.minute, 0)
                    last_minute = c_t.minute

                    send_stats(cmd_nodes(command, collect_time), c_t)
                    time.sleep(1)
                else:
                    time.sleep(1)
        except Exception, e:
            print e
            print "**Top Level Exception"
            pass
share|improve this answer

If you use Linux, you probably want to set up a cronjob which runs your script in certain intervals.

share|improve this answer
    
cron is not available on the device I am using. –  Linger Aug 31 '12 at 14:05

There are two ways to do this.

The first and best would be to use your OS's task scheduler (Task Scheduler in Windows, cron in Linux). The developers of these tools probably anticipated more issues than you can imagine and code you don't have to do yourself is time and probably bugs saved.

Otherwise, you need to take into account the execution time of your script. The simplest way to do that is instead of sleeping for your interval (which as you saw slowly slides forward), you would compute when is the next time you should execute based on when you last woke up and after execution, sleep only for the interval between now and then.

share|improve this answer

There is a very similar question already on Stack Overflow. Have you tried these solutions?

share|improve this answer

I'm assuming you want to do this in Python and not rely on any other systems.

You just need to account for when your process starts and when it ends and set your interval accordingly. The code will look something like this.

if __name__ == '__main__':
while True:
    try:
        r = json.read(rqst_command())
        interval = r.get('intvl')
        collect_time = r.get('c_time')
        command = r.get('cmd')
        start_time = datetime.now()
        send_stats(cmd_nodes(command, collect_time))
        end_time = datetime.now()
        sleepy_time = interval - (end_time - start_time)
        time.sleep(sleepy_time)
    except Exception, e:
        print e
        print "**Top Level Exception"
        pass
share|improve this answer

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