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I am developing a webApplication based on Java EE.

I have an abstract class, in which I need to have a one-time operation (a database call).

So below in the sample code, I pasted it inside its constructor, but don't know why the constructor is not getting invoked.

Please tell me how to solve this.

public abstract class Preethi {

 Preethi()
 {
    System.out.println("hirerew");
 }

 public static void main(String args[])
 {
    int a  = 12;

    if(a==0)
        System.out.println("a");

    if (a==12)
        System.out.println("12");
 }

}
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you dont create any instance of this class (Know it is abstract but still sth can inherit from it). Then call super to invoke the constructor. –  gregory561 Aug 30 '12 at 14:05

5 Answers 5

You never create an instance of abstract class Preethi. Why do you expect the constructor to get called? Make a non-abstract subclass and create an instance of it and then the constructor will be called. main is static, it can be called without Preethi being realized.

public class X extends Preethi
{ /* Your implementation here */}

Then in main:

public static void main(String [] args)
{
  Preethi preethi = new X(); // This will call the constructor of Preethi
}
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Constructor is not being invoked because main() method is called without instantiating a main class.

To invoke it - you need to create an object of Preethi explicitly.

UPD. as anio suggests - you need to subclass Preethi and instantiate it.

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Although abstract classes cannot be used to instantiate objects, they can be used to create object references, because Java's approach to run-time polymorphism is implemented through the use of superclass references. Thus, it must be possible to create a reference to an abstract class so that it can be used to POINT TO A SUBCLASS object.

You can make it not abstract, or create a subclass that invokes super() on your abstract class.

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See the code below:

public abstract class Preethi {

    // constructor:
    Preethi() {
        System.out.println("hirerew");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // call the constructor:
        new Preethi() {};  // "{}" needed because our class is abstract.
    }

}

The point here is that you don't always have to create a new class, but can define a 'one-time' class next to the constructor. For example:

public abstract class A {
    public abstract void foo();
    public A() { foo(); }
}

You could do the following:

A a = new A() { 
    public void foo() { 
        System.out.println("hello"); 
    } 
};

The output would simply be "hello". A similar method could also be utilized for interfaces.

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You are not creating object of Preethi. In order to make call to constructor, You have to remove abstract keyword from class and create it's object

Or create anonymous inner class and it's object as :

new Preethi() {
   // abstract method impl
};

Or create sub class of Preethi, and create object of it.

FYI: You can create object references of any abstract class or interfaces. You can not create object of them.

And I think making main class abstract really does not make any sense. Atlease to me.(Tell me if I am wrong)

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