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Any computation is possible at compile-time with C++ template metafunctions. Therefore, I was considering, if the following were possible:

void my_function(char const* string_ptr)
{
  switch (hash_function(string_ptr))
  {
    case hash_metafunction<"yoohooo">::value:
      ...
      break;

    case hash_metafunction<"woooooo">::value:
      ...
      break;

    ...
  }
}

Can you give leads as to where to find code (library) for both the hash function and template metafunction. If none such library exists, can you give hints on how I might roll the template metafunction myself? I am particularly worried about the char const* parameter to the template metafunction. Maybe some preprocessor magic is possible?

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3  
String literals can't be template parameters. However, user-defined literals may be what you need: "yoohooo"_hash. – Kerrek SB Aug 30 '12 at 14:13
    
This is why I am asking for preprocessor magic, i.e. with variadic templates 'y', 'o', 'o', 'h' ... might be possible. – user1095108 Aug 30 '12 at 14:14
    
Actually, you can't use templaty UDLs for string literals... But if you wrote foo<'y', 'o', 'o', ...> it could of course be done. – Kerrek SB Aug 30 '12 at 14:18
    
Yes, yes, I'd like to know if it is possible to transform the "yoohoo" string with a preprocessor macro into 'y', 'o', 'o', ... – user1095108 Aug 30 '12 at 14:24
up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about a constexpr function? Of course implementing that hash could be a pain. You'll have something like this:

// maybe another return type
constexpr uint64_t hash_metafunction(const char* input) {
    // replace some_value with the hash implementation
    return some_value;
}

void my_function(char const* string_ptr)
{
  switch (hash_function(string_ptr))
  {
    case hash_metafunction("yoohooo"):
      ...
      break;

    case hash_metafunction("woooooo"):
      ...
      break;

    ...
  }
}

The hash_metafunction function would be executed on compile-time.

Edit: This is a naive implementation, which basically converts the input string to a uint64_t:

constexpr uint64_t do_the_hash(const char* input, uint64_t value_so_far) {
    return *input ? do_the_hash(input + 1, (value_so_far << 8) | *input) : value_so_far;
}

constexpr uint64_t hash_metafunction(const char* input) {
    return do_the_hash(input, 0);
}

Live demo here.

Edit: I've implemented a compile time MD5, you can find the source code here. In order to use it, do the following:

#include <iostream>
#include "md5.h"

int main() {
    constexpr auto value = ConstexprHashes::md5("constexpr rulz");

    std::cout << std::hex;
    for(auto v : value) {
        if(((size_t)v & 0xff) < 0x10)
            std::cout << '0';
        std::cout << ((size_t)v & 0xff);
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

This prints out the hash: "b8b4e2be16d2b11a5902b80f9c0fe6d6".

share|improve this answer
    
Idea is good. How to iterate over all chars in the string? – user1095108 Aug 30 '12 at 14:50
    
There you go, edited my answer. Everything is done recursively. – mfontanini Aug 30 '12 at 14:52
    
Amazing, too bad a library with similar functionality does not exist. – user1095108 Aug 30 '12 at 14:57
1  
It only needs to be done once, then everyone can benefit from it. – user1095108 Aug 30 '12 at 15:00
1  
I've implemented an MD5 constexpr hash. See my answer for the link. – mfontanini Aug 31 '12 at 1:25

I have created a constexpr version of MurmurHash3 as a gist on GitHub.

int main() {
  constexpr uint32_t hash = Murmur3_32("some_string_to_hash", 0xAED123FD);
  assert(hash == 4291478129);
}
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