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Say, I have a simple class Fruit defined as follows:

public class Fruit {
    int price;

    public boolean isEqualPrice(Fruit object) {
        return (object.price == price);         
    }
}

Now, there are several subclasses of Fruit such as Apple, Orange, Mango etc. I want the method isEqualPrice to be valid only when these subclasses are the same. For example, Apple.isEqualPrice(Apple) would be valid, but Apple.isEqualPrice(Orange) would not be. How should I define the parameter of isEqualPrice to acheive this? I don't want to override isEqualPrice in every subclasses of Fruit.

One possible solution might be:

public boolean isEqualPrice(Fruit object) {
        if(this.getClass() != object.getClass())
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        return (object.price == price);         
    }

But it will report classes are same or not only at runtime, and an user has no way to realize the correct parameter type watching the method signature. Is there any way to detect this at compile time?

NOTE: I think compareTo method of enum is such kind of method, as every enum has this method and a type of enum can't be compared to other type. But I couldn't understand how it is implemented.

share|improve this question
    
What error do you get at runtime? –  johncarl Aug 30 '12 at 14:28
    
What error is it reporting? –  jeyoung Aug 30 '12 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make Fruit generic, or add a generic subclass of fruit and derive Apple, Orange etc. from that.

class Fruit {
   ...
}

class FruitGeneric<T extends Fruit> extends Fruit {
    public boolean isEqualPrice (T otherFruit) {
        ...
    }
}

class Apple extends FruitGeneric<Apple> {
   ...
}

class Orange extends FruitGeneric<Orange> {
   ...
}
share|improve this answer

You certainly can:

class Fruit <T extends Fruit>{
    int price;
    public boolean isEqualPrice(T object1) {
        return (object1.price == price);
    }
}

class Mango extends Fruit<Mango>{

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works :) The only problem is that if I declare price private, I can't access it within Fruit. –  Rafi Kamal Aug 30 '12 at 14:57
    
Well, just define a getter for price. It is perfectly acceptable. –  Vitaliy Aug 30 '12 at 17:55

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