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Given two arrays, one with keys, one with values:

keys = ['foo', 'bar', 'qux']
values = ['1', '2', '3']

How would you convert it to an object, by only using underscore.js methods?

{
   foo: '1', 
   bar: '2',
   qux: '3'
}

I'm not looking for a plain javascript answer (like this).

I'm asking this as a personal exercise. I thought underscore had a method that was doing exactly this, only to find out it doesn't, and that got me wondering if it could be done. I have an answer, but it involves quite a few operations. How would you do it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you need to use is the _.object method of underscore js. If object method is not present in your version of underscore.js then you will have to manually add this method to it.

_.object = function(list, values) {
    if (list == null) return {};
    var result = {};
    for (var i = 0, l = list.length; i < l; i++) {
      if (values) {
        result[list[i]] = values[i];
      } else {
        result[list[i][0]] = list[i][1];
      }
    }
    return result;
  };
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1  
Yes, you are right, as of Underscore 1.4.0 the _.object function will do just that. Thanks for the update. –  Cristi Mihai Jan 18 '13 at 15:19
    
If object method is not present in your version of underscore.js then update to latest version :) –  Cristi Mihai Jan 18 '13 at 15:22
    
Nice. Thank you. –  arcseldon Jun 9 at 10:02
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How about:

keys = ['foo', 'bar', 'qux'];
values = ['1', '2', '3'];
some = {};
_.each(keys,function(k,i){some[k] = values[i];});

To be complete: another approach could be:

 _.zip(['foo', 'bar', 'qux'],['1', '2', '3'])
  .map(function(v){this[v[0]]=v[1];}, some = {});

For the record, without underscore you could extend Array.prototype:

Array.prototype.toObj = function(values){
   values = values || this.map(function(v){return true;}); 
   var some;
   this .map(function(v){return [v,this.shift()]},values)
        .map(function(v){this[v[0]]=v[1];},some = {});
   return some; 
};
// usage
var some = ['foo', 'bar', 'qux'].toObj(['1', '2', '3']);

See jsfiddle

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Nice, better then what I came up with (zip then reduce to new object) –  Cristi Mihai Aug 30 '12 at 15:05
1  
Hi @Cristi, added a _.zip and .map alternative –  KooiInc Aug 30 '12 at 18:17
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What you are looking for is the zip function.

zip function

Edit: It doesn't create an object but it does combine the array by creating a sub array

There's no function that exactly does what you want. But you can use the result of zip to create your object.

var arr = _.zip(['foo', 'bar', 'qux'], ['1', '2', '3']);
var i, len = arr.length;
var new_obj = [];

for(i=0; i<len; ++i)
   new_obj[arr[i][0]] = arr[i][1];
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zip is not enough, _.zip(['foo', 'bar', 'qux'], ['1', '2', '3']) is [['foo, '1'], ['bar', '2'], ['qux', '3']] –  Cristi Mihai Aug 30 '12 at 14:31
    
I added a code to use the return of zip to create the object. underscore doesn't have a function that does exactly what you want. –  Richard Heath Aug 30 '12 at 14:58
    
Thanks for your answer, yes, it seems there is no pure underscore way of doing it. –  Cristi Mihai Aug 30 '12 at 15:03
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Cleanest is

function (keys, vals) {
    return keys.reduce (
        function(prev, val, i) { prev[val] = vals[i]; return prev; }, 
        {}
    );
}

Or, use _.reduce, but if you're using underscore you already have _.object.

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