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I create a class like this

class myClass {

public:  
 int addMeOne; 
 void Invoked()  { .... }
};

I created an object of it and used to send it to all other modules of my program by reference . Everyone used to increment the addMeOne variable by 1 . some even used to add twice but that’s not the point .

With this , now I want whenever someone alters addMeOne , my function Invoked() should get called .

Please note that the right strategy would have been that I should have allowed addMeOne to be exposed outside by some function and inside that function I could call Invoked . However , the interface cannot be altered now since this is now exposed to the all others and should not be modified. How can I correct this . ?

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2  
You should be providing getter and setter methods which alter the value and then invoke your callback. – meagar Aug 30 '12 at 14:29
    
You can do this through reference wrappers, but that's about it. – Richard J. Ross III Aug 30 '12 at 14:29
2  
Not easily. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/3159165/… – enderland Aug 30 '12 at 14:30

You have to make a method that would assign the value to the addMeOne variable, this is known as a setter method, and make the variable itself private.

There is no way to trigger a function upon changing an integer variable, I believe.

One alternative which would change the interface, but would not require changing the code outside is to define a class that would mimic the behavior of an integer, i.e. implement operator++ etc., and change addMeOne to this type.

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please comment when downvoting – Qnan Aug 30 '12 at 14:31
    
Before your series of (multiple?) edits your answer did nothing to address what the question was asking. – enderland Aug 30 '12 at 14:37
    
@enderland that was part of the answer. The OP asks whether this can be done without changing the interface and the answer to that is negative. – Qnan Aug 30 '12 at 15:20

You needv to read up on encapsulation. Without providing a locked down getter / setter interface to addMeOn there is no way to guarantee control over its use.

Don't be afraid to change the interface. It will not be a big task for anyone using it to change and they should be clear that what you are doing in changing it is to provide value for their benefit.

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Should you preserve the ABI of this class, or just the syntax that its clients use? If you can change the type of addMeOne, preserving the ability to write addMeOne++ etc, you can define a class and the relevant operators for it - then make addMeOne to be an instance of this class. Certainly, now addMeOne operators can do anything -- including invocations of some MyClass member functions.

Psuedo-code:

class Proxy
{
public:
  Proxy(YourClass *parent) : parent_(parent), value_(0)
  {}
  void operator++() 
  {
    ++value_;
    // doAnything with parent_
  }
  // accessors, cast operators etc...
private:
  YourClass *parent_;
  int value_;
};

class YourClass
{
public:
  YourClass() : addMeOne(this)
  {}
  Proxy addMeOne;
};
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Really, it's probably worth telling all clients to use a method instead of a public variable. You either need to change the class, the clients or both.

There's no way around it. Do it again and do it right. Take the hit.

There are tricks: Once you expose a member variable one thing that you can do is to replace int addMeOne with some other variable with the same name but a different type. countedint addMeOne. The countedint class you would have to write such that it behaves like an int but that the assignment, incrementation and so on also counts the number of times they have been used. For example

countedint & operator ++(){
   m_value++;
   m_number_of_uses++;
   return *this;
}
countedint & operator --(){
   m_value--;
   m_number_of_uses++;
   return *this;
}

You would probably also need to have a cast operator to int and you could count the number of uses there too.

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Use can turn addMeOne into a proxy.

class myClass 
{
    class addMeOneProxy
    {
        public:
            addMeOneProxy(myClass &s) : parent(s) {}

            // This gets called whenever something tries to use the addMeOne 
            // member variable as an integer.
            operator int() const 
            {
                return parent.addMeOne;
            }

            // This gets called whenever something assigns a value to addMeOne.
            int operator=(int val) 
            {
                parent.Invoked(); 
                return val;
            }

            // You could also implement an operator++ or whatever else you need.

        private:
            myClass &parent;
    };

  public:
    void Invoked();
    addMeOneProxy addMeOne;
};

Of course, if you decide to make Invoked() private at some point, you will need to make myClass a friend class of addMeOneProxy so that addMeOneProxy can call the Invoked member function.

I certainly concur with the other commenters that you should really have getter and setter functions for this, but I also understand that developers often have limited power to control and change the world they live in. So, the proxy is how you can do it if you aren't able or allowed to change the world.

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