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I've got this code (well, something similar).

private delegate void GenericCallback<T>(T Info);

private void DoWork()
{
    System.Threading.Thread Worker = new System.Threading.Thread(
            delegate() 
            {
                TestMethod(TestMethodCallback<string>);
            }
    );
    Worker.Start();
}

private void TestMethod(GenericCallback<string> Callback)
{
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
    if(Callback != null)
    {
        Callback("Complete");
    }
}

private void TestMethod(GenericCallback<int> Callback)
{
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
    if(Callback != null)
    {
        Callback(25);
    }
}

private void TestMethodCallback<T>(T Info)
{
    MessageBox.Show(Info.ToString());
}

Which allows me to call different versions of TestMethod based on the type of a parameter, while also allowing me to have a single callback method.

Is this bad form, or an accepted practice?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It looks like you might be looking for the Action delegate type. It's basically what you have here: a generic void-returning delegate type.

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What if I want to use a delegate like this private delegate void GenericCallback<T>(T Info, int err); can I still use Action? –  Tester101 Aug 30 '12 at 14:40
1  
@Tester101 You want an Action<T, int> then. –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 14:40
    
I think you'd have to use Action<t, int>, but I'm not deeply familiar with delegate subtyping. –  Thom Smith Aug 30 '12 at 14:42
    
Thom, yeah it works fine. In the context of a generic method or class with T as a type parameter, then Action<T, int> means an Action<T1, T2> with T for T1 and int for T2. Some members of System.Threading.Tasks.Parallel show this in practice. –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 14:50

Such an established practice, that some of the work has been done for you. Action in this case, and Func should you return a value, are generic delegates, precisely like this. An advantage is, if I saw your signature:

private void TestMethod(GenericCallback<string> Callback)

I have to look up what GenericCallback<string> is. If I saw:

private void TestMethod(Action<string> callback)

I already know.

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Totally fine. In this very simple case it might be preferable to specify a string (since your generic type, with no constraints, can only be dealt with as an Object and so ToString() is one of the very few useful things you can call no matter what you pass), but obviously this is example code so there are very many accepted ways to do this. Action<> and Func<> are indeed good built-ins to know about, but they have some drawbacks, such as reduced self-documentation (it can be difficult to tell what a Func is expected to do, other than the obvious "take an integer and return an integer".

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Assuming that this would be used for returning data asynchronously (otherwise, why not wait for the return value?), it sounds like you haven't discovered Task Parallel Library. In particular, Task<T> is a more generalized way of acheiving callback-like behaviour.

For instance:

private Task<int> TestMethod()
{
    TaskCompletionSource<int> tcs=new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
    //do something asynchronous
    //when asynchronous job is complete
    //tcs.SetResult(25);
    return tcs.Task;

}
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Not strictly necessary, as there are half a dozen ways to implement the asynchronous model, but this is indeed one of them. –  KeithS Aug 30 '12 at 14:44
    
It's the big one really. Given developments in .net 4.5 (async/await), I'd say Task<T> supersedes all other ways of performing this kind of operation. It's been adopted wholesale by MS in most async APIs. –  spender Aug 30 '12 at 14:49
    
I'd say it depends. Task<T> shouldn't be used in certain circumstances (first one that came to mind is to make an async call to a method that touches the UI; there's Control.BeginInvoke for that). Async/await is a useful shortcut but it doesn't make doing it the "long way" any less valid, just like yield return doesn't make creating an IEnumerable implementation the "wrong" way to do it (Linq, for instance, has iterator classes, written by people with intimate knowledge of yield return). –  KeithS Aug 30 '12 at 14:54
    
There's special case scheduling for UI stuff, such that waiting for tasks from the UI will ensure that the task's result is picked up on the UI thread. See this: stackoverflow.com/questions/5647150/… –  spender Aug 30 '12 at 14:57

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