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I regularly see this style of resource clean-up:

InputStream in = null;
try {
    in = new FileInputStream(file);
    // ...
} finally {
    if (in != null) {
        in.close();
    }
}

I have always used the following style:

final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file);
try {
    // ...
} finally {
    in.close();
}

But am I missing something? Is there an advantage to the former that I'm not seeing?

share|improve this question
    
You might be missing something... new FileInputStream() can throw FileNotFoundException. So that exception won't be catched in that block of code, but it will be propagated to the caller. –  Augusto Aug 30 '12 at 14:56
1  
@Augusto neither examples catch the FileNotFoundException. not sure if that was intentional however. –  Colin D Aug 30 '12 at 14:57
1  
I think the former is only meaningful if it also has a catch block. In other cases, your form is cleaner. –  Dilum Ranatunga Aug 30 '12 at 15:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suspect its to avoid having two nested try/catch blocks instead of one.

InputStream in = null;
try {
    in = new FileInputStream(file);
    // ...
} catch(IOException ioe) {
    // handle exception.
} finally {
    IOUtils.closeQuietly(in);
}

The second case is incomplete.

try {
    final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file);
    try {
        // ...
    } finally {
        in.close();
    }
} catch(IOException e) {
    // handle exception
}

If you have multiple files, this could get really messy.

share|improve this answer
1  
I like this answer, even though it is short and missing explanations. –  Colin D Aug 30 '12 at 15:02
    
Can you show what the exception handling looks like for the other version too? Is it really any cleaner? –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 15:09
    
@aetheria The first example is complete, you don't need an outer catch. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 30 '12 at 16:02
    
What do you mean by "complete"? The first version does not have any catch block! –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 16:07
    
@aetheria It depends on your assumptions, but if they are the same the first example should looks as I have added. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 30 '12 at 16:10

Lets say you need to open not one, but two files. You would do

final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file1);
final OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(file2);
try {
    // ...
} finally {
    out.close();
    in.close();
}

If the out fails to open, you will get an exception and because it's out of the try block in won't be closed in the finally block.

In the other method:

InputStream in = null;
OutputStream out = null;
try {
    in = new FileInputStream(file1);
    out = new FileOutputStream(file2);
    // ...
} finally {
    if (out != null) out.close();
    if (in != null) in.close();
}

If out fails to open, you will go to the finally block and close both streams. If in fails to open, you will go to the finally block, and free only in - because out==null.

edit

As the aetheria mentioned, that code wouldn't work because close() throws exception in Java. It can easily be fixed by putting each resource release in it's own try-catch block:

InputStream  in  = null;
OutputStream out = null;
try {
    in = new FileInputStream(file1);
    out = new FileOutputStream(file2);
    // ...
} finally {
    try{ out.close(); }catch(Exception e){}
    try{ in.close();  }catch(Exception e){}
}

I ditched the null checking - if in or out is null, it'll throw a NullPointerException that will be ignored. And the reason I ignore close exceptions is that disposal methods shouldn't throw exceptions in the first place. If handling closing exceptions is required, you can always close the streams again, after the finally block. That way, any stream that can be closed will be closed already(so you wouldn't have to worry about it), and you can handle any exceptions from close more elegantly.

Now, aetheria also suggested to put a separate try-finally block for each resource that would look like this:

final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file1);
try {
    final OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(file2);
    try {
        // ...
    } finally {
        out.close();
    }
} finally {
    in.close();
}

This works, but even with only two resources, it's much less elegant, as it splits the allocations and releasing code, making it harder to keep track of it(in my opinion, at least).

share|improve this answer
    
This code contains bugs: if out.close() throws an IOException you will never close in. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 15:22
    
To add to my last comment. I would not do what you suggest I would do at the top of your question. I would have separate try..finally blocks for each stream. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 15:29
    
You're right, but I'd rather blame this on Java than admitting my own mistake. Anyways, I'v updated the answer. –  Idan Arye Sep 1 '12 at 2:36

The null check here for the InputStream is necessary as it is possible that the variable might not be assigned. In this case a NullPointerException would be thrown when attempting to close it when calling:

in.close();

In the 2nd block outside of the try/catch block:

final InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file);
try {
    // ...
} finally {
    in.close();
}

You can easily encounter other exceptions before entering the block and the InputStream is never closed.

share|improve this answer
    
in is assigned directly before the try. It cannot be null. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 14:58
    
@aetheria the //... can make it null –  Colin D Aug 30 '12 at 14:58
    
Fine, I've made it final. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 14:59

The second one will not compile since the constructor of FileInputStream can throw a FileNotFoundException, thus you'd need an extra try-catch block, unless of course, the method itself throws it.

Another common idiom is to write a closeQuietly() method to avoid having to write the if (is != null) check all over your finally blocks. This is what Apache Common's IOUtils does:

public static void closeQuietly(InputStream input) {
  try {
    if (input != null) {
      input.close();
    }
  } catch (IOException ioe) {
    // ignore
  }
}

Also note that since Java 7, you can use the following:

try (InputStream is = new FileInputStream(file)) {
} catch (final FileNotFoundException | IOException ex) { 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sure, I haven't shown the code it sits in, but the method is declared to throw IOException so it compiles fine. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 15:03
1  
title specifies java 6 –  Sednus Aug 30 '12 at 15:03

This is very simple example, And may not create a problem as you are creating InputStream in same bloke. But if InputStream is closed because of some Exception or other fault, in that case your code will fail, So its always better to check if InputStream is available

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My code won't fail. Most streams allow close() to be called multiple times, but at the worst, the call to close() may throw an IOException, but that's fine. The exception can be handled further up the call-stack just like any other IOException. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 15:21

Suppose that in the first example you have some other code before defining in that gets you out of the try block. If you get to the finally without in been defined you will get a NullPointerException when trying to close it. So you will have to make the check to avoid errors like that.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but in cannot be null in my version. –  aetheria Aug 30 '12 at 14:57

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