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Imagine I have two vectors each of different length. I want to generate one plot with the density of both vectors overlaid. What I thought I should do is this:

vec1 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(2000, 0, 1))
vec2 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(3000, 1, 1.5))
ggplot() + geom_density(aes(x=x, colour="red"), data=vec1) + 
  geom_density(aes(x=x, colour="blue"), data=vec2)

Then I thought I should do this:

vec1 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(2000, 0, 1))
vec2 <- data.frame(y=rnorm(3000, 1, 1.5))
ggplot() + geom_density(aes(x=x, colour="red"), data=vec1) + 
  geom_density(aes(x=y, colour="blue"), data=vec2)

Neither of these quite work, because the colors get mixed up.

Based on another solution I found in StackOverflow 1 2, I realized I should try this:

vec1 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(2000, 0, 1), grp="vec1")
vec2 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(3000, 1, 1.5), grp="vec2")
allDat <- rbind(vec1, vec2)

ggplot(allDat, aes(x, colour=grp)) + geom_density()

ggplot(allDat, aes(x, colour=grp)) + geom_density() + 
  scale_colour_manual(values=c("green", "blue"))

ggplot(allDat, aes(x, colour=grp)) + geom_density() + 
  scale_colour_manual(values=c(vec2="green", vec1="blue"))

OK, I solved my original problem. But is there a way to do something akin to the first one I tried above? From the way things are worded in the ggplot documentation, I would have thought so. Appreciate any suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
You could probably add scale_colour_manual(values = c('blue','red')) to your first attempt, but your last attempt is probably the more accepted route. –  joran Aug 30 '12 at 15:28
    
Hmmm, and nope. that doesn't work either. –  rmflight Aug 30 '12 at 15:39
    
You'll have to be more specific, because it works just fine for me. –  joran Aug 30 '12 at 15:40
    
Using: ggplot() + geom_density(aes(x=x, colour="red"), data=vec1) + geom_density(aes(x=x, colour="blue"), data=vec2) + scale_colour_manual(values=c('red', 'blue')) Yes, it changes the colors. But, it assigns the wrong color to the wrong distribution. At least for me, the 0 centered dist. is blue, and the wider dist. w mean of 1 is red, when I am asking for the opposite. –  rmflight Aug 30 '12 at 15:47
    
Um...so switch them in the two geom_density calls to reverse them back? I realize that's backwards and everything, but your first attempt just isn't how the logic of legends works in ggplot. You don't assign color labels to things in the geom. That's just not how it's done. –  joran Aug 30 '12 at 15:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Everything will work fine if you move the assignment of the colour parameter out of aes().

vec1 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(2000, 0, 1))
vec2 <- data.frame(x=rnorm(3000, 1, 1.5))

library(ggplot2)

ggplot() + geom_density(aes(x=x), colour="red", data=vec1) + 
  geom_density(aes(x=x), colour="blue", data=vec2)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
And that was the "little" twiggly thing that kept tripping me up. All the examples I found showed colour in aes(). Thank you, this might be useful when I have some really big vectors that I don't really want to concatenate into one data frame. –  rmflight Aug 30 '12 at 18:53

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