Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Back to basics, I have a situation whereby I have an image which needs to appear over the background of an element just below it. However, I do not want the image to be over the top of the content of that element, only the element (and background properties) itself:

http://jsfiddle.net/chricholson/4twr5/1/

HTML:

<img src="https://www.google.com/images/srpr/logo3w.png" />

<div>
    <a href="#">Hello World</a>
</div>
​

CSS:

img { position: absolute; z-index: 20; }

div { position: relative; top: 45px; z-index: 10; padding: 30px; background: red; }

a { position: relative; z-index: 30; padding: 10px; background: yellow; display: block; }

Expected behaviour would be the image to appear over the top of the div background [check], but then appear behind the yellow link, which it isn't.

share|improve this question
    
so you want the image to be in background of the hello world element ? –  insomiac Aug 30 '12 at 15:18
    
If you want image in the background? its fixed here : jsfiddle.net/4twr5/2 –  insomiac Aug 30 '12 at 15:20
    
want image above the hello world or below?? –  Arpit Srivastava Aug 30 '12 at 15:21
    
the image should appear BELOW "hello world" but ABOVE the red box –  Chris Nicholson Aug 30 '12 at 15:21
    
then apply as background-image that google image –  Arpit Srivastava Aug 30 '12 at 15:22
show 3 more comments

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Found my "answer" (more confirming my doubts) here Can't get z-index to work for div inside of another div. The key sentence being "Once you set position:relative on test_1 you are causing its z-index to be in a different world than the z-index of test_2."

It seems the reason I have a problem is because once I have set the image higher than the div, no matter what z-index value I set to the contents of the div it will always be covered. I didn't think z-indexes worked like this, I thought everything was "separate" and so long as a value was higher than a value elsewhere (regardless of parent containers) things would be fine.

share|improve this answer
add comment
img { position: absolute; z-index: 15; }

div { position: relative; top: 45px; z-index: 20; padding: 30px; background: red; }

a {z-index: 30; padding: 10px; background: yellow; display: block; }
​

You can try this code. By the way a is a child of div. You don't need to type position: relative; Because you wrote for div.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Put the image inside the div like so:

<div>
    <img src="https://www.google.com/images/srpr/logo3w.png" />
    <a href="#">Hello World</a>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
According to the comments on the original post, he cannot change the HTML, so he can't nest the image in the div. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Aug 30 '12 at 15:29
add comment

Most of the answers here are pointing out the base truth: in straight up HTML + CSS, this is probably only possible if the <img> is inside of the <div> and a sibling to <a>.

Since you've indicated that you can't change the HTML, you could instead apply a simple JavaScript that would reorder the DOM as necessary for you: $('div').prepend(​$('img')​​​​);​. (This is JQuery, by the way.) What this does is it takes the <img> and sticks it as the first child in <div>.

Of course, if you were to use this in production code, you'd want to append id's to the elements and select off that otherwise you'd have images being stuck into divs willy nilly.

Here is a JSFiddle demo. The JQuery is called onDomReady(). The HTML itself is unchanged.

share|improve this answer
add comment

http://jsfiddle.net/4twr5/21/ Look this jsfiddle

Update according to comment http://jsfiddle.net/4twr5/22/

share|improve this answer
    
According to the comments on the original post, he cannot change the HTML, so he can't nest the image in the div. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Aug 30 '12 at 15:29
    
@Roddy of the Frozen Peas: correct :) although the outcome of that fiddle is how I want it to look eventually. –  Chris Nicholson Aug 30 '12 at 15:32
    
@ChrisNicholson check now fiddle –  Arpit Srivastava Aug 30 '12 at 15:43
    
Haha nice try but still not a valid option I'm afraid. You can probably tell from my example how things are positioned in weird places, that's pretty much how it has to stay. –  Chris Nicholson Aug 30 '12 at 15:46
    
@Chris Nicholson-then use RoddyoftheFrozenPeas answer that is most appropriate answer –  Arpit Srivastava Aug 30 '12 at 15:49
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.