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The sorting part:

      order = (struct order_s **) calloc(pm->len - q, sizeof(struct order_s*));

      for (i = 0; i < window_pos; ++i) {
              order[i] = (struct order_s *) malloc(sizeof(struct order_s));
              order[i]->pos = i;
              order[i]->good = good[i];
      }
      for (i = window_pos + q; i < pm->len; ++i)
      {
              order[i-q] = (struct order_s *) malloc(sizeof(struct order_s));
              order[i-q]->pos = i;
              order[i-q]->good = good[i];
      }
     qsort(order, pm->len - q, sizeof(struct order_s *), compare);

The compare function:

int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
        if ((((const struct order_s *)a)->good - ((const struct order_s *)b)->good) > 0)
                return 1;
        else
                return -1;
}

The stucture:

struct order_s {
  int pos;
  double good;
};

The values:

(gdb) p pm->len
$35 = 20
(gdb) p window_pos 
$36 = 1
(gdb) p q
$37 = 5

Before qsort():

(gdb) p *order[0]
$2 = {pos = 0, good = 1.3238653863672125}
(gdb) p *order[1]
$3 = {pos = 6, good = 0.96180564211148134}
(gdb) p *order[2]
$4 = {pos = 7, good = 1.0684181637005736}
(gdb) p *order[3]
$5 = {pos = 8, good = 0.92113662370476379}

After qsort():

(gdb) n
(gdb) p *order[0]
$6 = {pos = 0, good = 1.3238653863672125}
(gdb) p *order[1]
$7 = {pos = 6, good = 0.96180564211148134}
(gdb) p *order[2]
$8 = {pos = 7, good = 1.0684181637005736}
(gdb) p *order[3]
$9 = {pos = 8, good = 0.92113662370476379}

After the qsort function, the array of structure isn't sorted right and throws the segment fault later.

share|improve this question
    
So what does it do? Do the values look sane if you break inside compare? –  Useless Aug 30 '12 at 15:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The compare() function arguments are pointers to elements of the array. In this case, the elements of the array are struct order*, which means the arguments to compare() are struct order**, not struct order*.

Change to:

int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
    const struct order_s** aa = a;
    const struct order_s** bb = b;

    /* Can two 'order_s' instances never be equal ? */
    if ( (*aa)->good - (*bb)->good) > 0) return 1;
    else  return -1;
}

From the C99 standard section 7.20.5.2 The qsort function:

The contents of the array are sorted into ascending order according to a comparison function pointed to by compar, which is called with two arguments that point to the objects being compared. The function shall return an integer less than, equal to, or greater than zero if the first argument is considered to be respectively less than, equal to, or greater than the second.

share|improve this answer
    
That works. Thanks. –  hanfeisun Aug 30 '12 at 15:51
1  
I think compare() still has a problem since it never returns 0. It's conceivable (though unlikely) that qsort could call the comparator with pointers to the same object. If it doesn't get 0 for that, you're gonna have a bad time. –  Adrian McCarthy Aug 30 '12 at 17:27

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