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In http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/layout/howLayoutWorks.html we can read :

"The end result is that to determine the best size for the container, the system determines the sizes of the containers at the bottom of the containment hierarchy. These sizes then percolate up the containment hierarchy, eventually determining the container's total size."

This comment is not associated to a particular layout manager but seems to apply to the generic layout mechanism.

I would be grateful if a seasoned Java/Swing programmer could explain why this approach is better than a top-down approach.

In a top-down approach, the top-level container would tell its components: - hey components you have WxH pixels to layout yourselves ! - then these components would eventually tell their own components to do the same. Depending on the available space each component would decide how to layout its sub-components going down into the hierarchy. Eventually some components could decide not to paint themselves in case of lack of space.

This approach seems to me easier (for the programer) to understand and maintain.

Anybody knows alternative layout managers that work top-down ?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I don't necessarily feel any of them is better than the other. But at the end of the day they had to choose one. – biziclop Aug 30 '12 at 16:00
    
Layout managers can work bottom up, to produce "preferred size" but most also work from top down, to deal with fixed-size containers (consider what happens when you manually resize the frame). – parsifal Aug 30 '12 at 16:39

I think you should re-read that quote again

The end result is that to determine the best size for the container, the system determines the sizes of the containers at the bottom of the containment hierarchy. These sizes then percolate up the containment hierarchy, eventually determining the container's total size.

This talks about the best size for the container. This is of course determined by all the child components their best size, so best calculated from bottom to top.

This is what happens when you call the pack method on a JFrame.

However, it is true that in the end the child components can take only as much space as their parents allow them. And that is where the LayoutManager comes into play: you set the layout manager on the parent, and it will tell the children their position and their size (normally considering things like the preferred size the child components indicate)

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The reason that layout managers work like that is because they have to figure out the size of the container that they manage and its children. The best way to do this is to go as deep as possible and start figuring out its size by coming back up again (bottom-up). This is done recursively if a container has other containers as children.

For example:

  • we have a JPanel j1
  • in j1 there is a JButton
  • j1 is inside another panel j2

Now the best way to figure out the size of j2 is to go all the way down to the jbutton. It figures out that the size of the JButton is, let's say 50 x 50 pixels. That means that the size of j1 is 50 x 50 plus whatever children it contains. Let's say it comes out as 200 x 200. In this case, j2 knows that its child is 200 x 200 and it calculates its size taking this into account. Finally it reaches a size (for j2) of 500 x 500.

share|improve this answer
    
ok but at the top of the hierarchy we have a frame (window) whose size is (in general) decided by the user. This should be IMHO the starting point of the layout process, not the contents of the containers. – Thibault Langlois Aug 30 '12 at 16:07
    
@Davy_Crockett Not quite. As you may know, if you do things correctly, then on the window which is the top of the hierarchy you call something like frame.pack. This way, the layout managers of its children calculate their size, which determines the size of the window. – Radu Murzea Aug 30 '12 at 16:11
    
@Davy_Crockett: What should happen to text that doesn't fit in the deepest container? – trashgod Aug 30 '12 at 16:12
    
@trashgod: it would not be displayed. Like you do not see all the cells of a spreadsheet. – Thibault Langlois Aug 30 '12 at 16:18

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