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Let's say I have a website hosted on a server called Serv1 in our LAN.

I want to create some web services, which will allow users to download/upload data to the website's back-end SQL server.

I don't want to host the web services on Serv1. I want to host them on Serv2, which is in our LAN but does not have an external IP address.

Will this work or will I have to pay for an additional external IP address?

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You can configure your web server to forward the requests to Serv2 –  antlersoft Aug 30 '12 at 16:06
    
>> You can configure your web server to forward the requests to Serv2 << How? –  user1481183 Aug 30 '12 at 16:14
    
Not tested so a comment. In you router port forward the port(s) (endpoints) of the service(s) to Serv2. –  Blam Aug 30 '12 at 16:51
    
FYI, you should be using WCF instead of ASMX web services, if you have any choice at all. –  John Saunders Aug 30 '12 at 16:54
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3 Answers 3

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If you don't want to put the services in serv1 you will have to make serv2 available. web Services must be available, unless this will all work intranet and all the servers are available

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So is it not enough that serv2 is visible to serv1? Serv2 has to be available to the whole world? –  user1481183 Sep 6 '12 at 15:39
    
If you only do access to the services using server side, they don't need to be available to the all world, but if you want to access them using client side the client has to have access to the services. if you are using the internet serv2 will have to be accessible. –  Nygma7 Sep 7 '12 at 10:44
    
The whole world will access the website on Serv1. Serv2 is visible to Serv1 (they're in the same network). How can access the services in Serv2 from Serv1 using server side? Any examples, links? I'm using ASP.NET, c# __ Thank you! –  user1481183 Sep 10 '12 at 14:29
    
For example adding the wcf service or web services in your project, this will give you access to the services. In Server Side –  Nygma7 Sep 10 '12 at 16:12
    
Sorry... total newbie here... how can I add the service(s) to my project if they reside in another server? How can I access the service(s) using server side if they are hosted on a different server? –  user1481183 Sep 11 '12 at 16:38
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If the users are all internal users, an external IP address won't matter. Well, if all users are on the internal network that is.

If you need this service available outside of your network, I guess we'd need a bit more information (at least I would). If you have a domain that is externally accessible, I'd imagine you could have a URL on the domain route to your service on Serv2.

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> " I'd imagine you could have a URL on the domain route to your service on Serv2." << How would I do that? –  user1481183 Aug 30 '12 at 16:12
    
I'm not a server guy, so I'm not too sure. I know just enough to goof stuff up! –  Gromer Aug 30 '12 at 16:13
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It's not about IPs, it's about URLs.

If Serv2.yourdomain.com isn't visible, Serv2.yourdomain.com/service.asmx isn't visible either.

On the other hand, there are lots of ways to make Serv1.yourdomain.com/service.asmx pull data from elsewhere on your LAN.

Edit

I see this was unclear.

Since two subdomains can use the same IP, and one server can have many IPs, I think the OP's emphasis on IPs rather than subdomains was obscuring his actual requirement.

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Well, not really... Serv2.yourdomain.com is an alias for an IP address. You can bypass the domain name and call the IP directly, as in http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/service.asmx, but you need access to the IP address to do it. Same with the domain name. –  Robert Harvey Aug 30 '12 at 16:08
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