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The recommended way to calculate the rank of a matrix in R seems to be qr:

X <- matrix(c(1, 2, 3, 4), ncol = 2, byrow=T)
Y <- matrix(c(1.0, 1, 1, 1), ncol = 2, byrow=T)
qr(X)$rank
[1] 2
qr(Y)$rank
[1] 1

I was able to improve efficiency by modifying this function for my specific case:

qr2 <- function (x, tol = 1e-07) { 
  if (!is.double(x)) 
  storage.mode(x) <- "double"
  p <- as.integer(2)
  n <- as.integer(2)
  res <- .Fortran("dqrdc2", qr = x, n, n, p, as.double(tol),
                  rank = integer(1L), qraux = double(p), pivot = as.integer(1L:p), 
                  double(2 * p), PACKAGE = "base")[c(1, 6, 7, 8)]
  class(res) <- "qr"
  res}

qr2(X)$rank
[1] 2
qr2(Y)$rank
[1] 1

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(qr(X)$rank,qr2(X)$rank,times=1000)
Unit: microseconds
         expr    min     lq median     uq      max
1  qr(X)$rank 41.577 44.041 45.580 46.812 1302.091
2 qr2(X)$rank 19.403 21.251 23.099 24.331   80.997

Using R, is it possible to calculate the rank of a 2*2 matrix even faster?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Sure, just get rid of more stuff you don't need (because you know what the values are), don't do any checks, set DUP=FALSE, and only return what you want:

qr3 <- function (x, tol = 1e-07) {
  .Fortran("dqrdc2", qr=x*1.0, 2L, 2L, 2L, tol*1.0,
           rank = 0L, qraux = double(2L), pivot = c(1L,2L), 
           double(4L), DUP = FALSE, PACKAGE = "base")[[6L]]
}
microbenchmark(qr(X)$rank,qr2(X)$rank,qr3(X),times=1000)
# Unit: microseconds
#          expr    min      lq  median      uq     max
# 1  qr(X)$rank 33.303 34.2725 34.9720 35.5180 737.599
# 2 qr2(X)$rank 18.334 18.9780 19.4935 19.9240  38.063
# 3      qr3(X)  6.536  7.2100  8.3550  8.5995 657.099

I'm not an advocate of removing checks, but they do slow things down. x*1.0 and tol*1.0 ensure doubles, so that's kind-of a check and adds a little overhead. Also note that DUP=FALSE can potentially be dangerous, since you can alter the input object(s).

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fortune(98) - well, times 4 I suppose. –  BenBarnes Aug 30 '12 at 21:27
3  
@BenBarnes: I used the time I saved to look at lolcats on the interwebs. –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 30 '12 at 21:31
    
I am optimizing performance of a function that I need to run a few million times in a simulation. qr is used inside a while loop in this function. So, in the end those microseconds some up to hours. –  Roland Aug 31 '12 at 6:11

Let me now if this function lacks of some precautions in this case, but it seems to be quite fast

myrank <- function(x)
  if(sum(x^2) < 1e-7) 0 else if(abs(x[1,1]*x[2,2]-x[1,2]*x[2,1]) < 1e-7) 1 else 2

microbenchmark(qr(X)$rank, qr2(X)$rank, qr3(X), myrank(X), times = 1000)
Unit: microseconds
         expr    min     lq median      uq      max
1   myrank(X)  7.466  9.333 10.732 11.1990   97.521
2  qr(X)$rank 52.727 55.993 57.860 62.5260 1237.446
3 qr2(X)$rank 30.329 32.196 33.130 35.4625  178.245
4      qr3(X) 11.199 12.599 13.999 14.9310  116.185

system.time(for(i in 1:10e5) myrank(X))
   user  system elapsed 
   7.46    0.02    7.85 
system.time(for(i in 1:10e5) qr3(X))
   user  system elapsed 
  10.97    0.00   11.85 
system.time(for(i in 1:10e5) qr2(X)$rank)
   user  system elapsed 
  31.71    0.00   33.99 
system.time(for(i in 1:10e5) qr(X)$rank)
   user  system elapsed 
  55.01    0.03   59.73 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Your function is faster than Joshua's, but seems not to give exactly the same result as qr(X)$rank, when used in my actual test case (which I did not give here). It is not easy to find out, when and why it gives different results. Since the speed difference between your and Joshua`s function is not that big, I just take his function. But I upvoted your answer. –  Roland Aug 31 '12 at 6:58
    
@Roland, you are right, I have just compared my function and qr. 1e-7 is the problem here: for rank 0 I'd say it should be == 0, then there are more problems with rank 1 because qr outputs 2 even when all entries are about 1e-300, which is correct. But product of such entries is 0 in R, and myrank returns 1, so this is not a valid solution anymore. Dividing rows might work but then then function becomes slow. –  Julius Aug 31 '12 at 15:39

We can do even better using RcppEigen.

// [[Rcpp::depends(RcppEigen)]]
#include <RcppEigen.h>
using namespace Rcpp;
using   Eigen::Map;
using   Eigen::MatrixXd;
using   Eigen::FullPivHouseholderQR;
typedef  Map<MatrixXd>  MapMatd;

//calculate rank of a matrix using QR decomposition with pivoting 

// [[Rcpp::export]]
int rankEigen(NumericMatrix  m) {
   const MapMatd  X(as<MapMatd>(m));
   FullPivHouseholderQR<MatrixXd> qr(X);
   qr.setThreshold(1e-7);
   return qr.rank();
}

Benchmarks:

microbenchmark(rankEigen(X), qr3(X),times=1000)
Unit: microseconds
         expr   min    lq median    uq    max neval
 rankEigen(X) 1.849 2.465  2.773 3.081 18.171  1000
       qr3(X) 5.852 6.469  7.084 7.392 48.352  1000

However, the tolerance is not exactly the same as in LINPACK, because of different tolerance definitions:

test <- sapply(1:200, function(i) {
  Y <- matrix(c(10^(-i), 10^(-i), 10^(-i), 10^(-i)), ncol = 2, byrow=T)
  qr3(Y) ==  rankEigen(Y)
})

which.min(test)
#[1] 159

The threshold in FullPivHouseholderQR is defined as:

A pivot will be considered nonzero if its absolute value is strictly greater than |pivot|≤ threshold * |maxpivot| where maxpivot is the biggest pivot.

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