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Given the following models:

class Store(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=150)

class ItemGroup(models.Model):
    group = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    code = models.CharField(max_length=20)

class ItemType(models.Model):
    store = models.ForeignKey(Store, on_delete=models.CASCADE, related_name="item_types")
    item_group = models.ForeignKey(ItemGroup)
    type = models.CharField(max_length=100)

Inline's handle adding multiple item_types to a Store nicely when viewing a single Store.

The content admin team would like to be able to edit stores and their types in bulk. Is there a simple way to implement Store.item_types in list_editable which also allows adding new records, similar to horizontal_filter? If not, is there a straightforward guide that shows how to implement a custom list_editable template? I've been Googling but haven't been able to come up with anything.

Also, if there is a simpler or better way to set up these models that would make this easier to implement, feel free to comment.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about making ItemType a ManyToManyField for Store?

To me it seems logical that if you're changing the ItemTypes available in a Store, you're changing a property of the Store (not the ItemType).

e.g.:

from django.db import models

class ItemGroup(models.Model):
    group = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    code = models.CharField(max_length=20)

class ItemType(models.Model):
    item_group = models.ForeignKey(ItemGroup)
    type = models.CharField(max_length=100)

class Store(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=150)
    item_type = models.ManyToManyField(ItemType, related_name="store")

# admin
from django.contrib import admin

class StoreAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    list_display=('name', 'item_type',)
    list_editable=('item_type',)

for model in [(Store, StoreAdmin), (ItemGroup,), (ItemType,)]:
    admin.site.register(*model)

I get an error here:

File "C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\django\contrib\admin\validation.py", line 43, in validate
% (cls.__name__, idx, field))
django.core.exceptions.ImproperlyConfigured: 'StoreAdmin.list_display[1]', 'item_type' is a ManyToManyField which is not supported.

Which I solved by commenting out lines 41-43 in django.contrib.admin.validation:

#if isinstance(f, models.ManyToManyField):
#    raise ImproperlyConfigured("'%s.list_display[%d]', '%s' is a ManyToManyField which is not supported."
#        % (cls.__name__, idx, field))

Probably not the ideal solution, but it seemed to work for me.

share|improve this answer
    
First, my apologies that I had a typo'd plural on the ItemType model (fixed now). Wouldn't your implementation only allow 1 ItemType per Store? Stores definitely need to have multiple ItemTypes. – Nate Pinchot Sep 7 '12 at 15:39
    
No, each store will be able to have any number of ItemTypes. Also can't say changing the django source is a good idea! – slackjake Sep 8 '12 at 9:04
2  
slackjake - It sounds like multiple ItemType per Store is exactly something Nate wants. When I was testing, I expected that commenting out those lines would lead to some sort of error somewhere else in the code - and that I'd probably need to subclass ManyToManyField to get around it. Was quite surprised that it just worked straight away. – logworthy Sep 8 '12 at 22:55
    
@logworthy "To me it seems logical that if you're changing the ItemTypes available in a Store, you're changing a property of the Store (not the ItemType)." - I couldn't agree more. Coming from .NET ORMs and Rails it seemed completely backwards to me to implement a relationship between child and parent models by defining the relationship on the child instead of the parent. You are correct that multiple ItemTypes per Store is exactly what I want. I'll give this a try on Monday when I'm back in the office. I'm also curious to see how this will affect the database schema. Thanks. – Nate Pinchot Sep 9 '12 at 4:14
    
@logworthy I tried out your suggested solution but didn't really get anywhere. I commented out the lines you referenced to bypass the exception, but I don't get any type of ability to edit that field. All that's displayed is a bunch of text similar to <django.db.models.fields.related.ManyRelatedManager object at 0x104b97490> in that column. – Nate Pinchot Sep 12 '12 at 23:36

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