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I have the following Linq to Objects query:

var query = this._vaporizerData
    .Where(row => row.Coater == coater)
    .Where(row => row.Distributor == distributor)
    .Where(row => row.PowerTubeA.HasValue);

if (query.Any())
{
    tubeA = query
        .Where(row => row.CoaterTime.Value >= readTime.AddMinutes(-5))
        .Where(row => row.CoaterTime.Value <= readTime)
        .OrderByDescending(row => row.CoaterTime)
        .Select(row => row.PowerTubeA)
        .First()
        .Value;
}

I know that when the query.Any() line is executed, the first Linq query is evaluated. My question is this. Let's assume the results of the first query is 5 rows of data. When I execute the second query (starting with 'tubeA = query'), am I correct it will evaluate this against just the five rows returned from the first query?

Thanks very much.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I know that when the query.Any() line is executed, the first Linq query is evaluated.

Well, sort of. It's evaluated as far as necessary. So if you have a million rows in _vaporizerData but the first of them matches the filter, it's not going to iterate over the rest of the data.

When I execute the second query (starting with 'tubeA = query'), am I correct it will evaluate this against just the five rows returned from the first query?

Yes, but it will have to find those rows again, checking the filter against all the rows which didn't match the first time. So again, if you have a million rows in _vaporizerData but this time only the last row matches the original query, you'll end up checking against all the 999,999 non-matching rows again.

Also, if anything else changes the contents of _vaporizerData between the call to Any() and the call to First(), those changes will be visible, as it really is going back to the original data source.

It would be better to only execute the query once, e.g.

var minTime = readTime.AddMinutes(-5); // Avoid recalculation
var result = this._vaporizerData
                 .Where(row => row.Coater == coater)
                 .Where(row => row.Distributor == distributor)
                 .Where(row => row.PowerTubeA.HasValue);
                 .Where(row => row.CoaterTime.Value >= minTime)
                 .Where(row => row.CoaterTime.Value <= readTime)
                 .OrderByDescending(row => row.CoaterTime)
                 .Select(row => row.PowerTubeA)
                 .FirstOrDefault();

if (result != null)
{
    tubeA = result.Value;
}

EDIT: Two important points noted in comments:

  • Your original query would throw an exception if we the first query matched an item but the second didn't; the code above would just end up with result as null. That may or may not be an issue for you.
  • If you use MoreLINQ you could make this more efficient by using .MaxBy(row => row.CoaterTime) instead of using OrderByDescending and First. IIRC, that will fail on an empty input though, so you should only do this if you're using your original version with First, not the version above.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon. This is not what I want to happen, so it looks like I should convert the results of my first query to a List so I doesn't need to find those five rows a second time. – Randy Minder Aug 30 '12 at 17:23
    
@RandyMinder: Or just do it all in one query, as per my answer... – Jon Skeet Aug 30 '12 at 17:24
    
Also note that you could use MinBy, rather than an OrderBy/First. – Servy Aug 30 '12 at 17:27
    
To strictly replicate the query in the question, if result is null, we need to re-examine the original set, determine if the first set of predicates would be matched, and throw an exception if this is the case. – Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 17:28
    
@Servy: If you've got MoreLINQ, yes :) Will edit that in. – Jon Skeet Aug 30 '12 at 17:28

Lets imagine the collection is a list. Lets imagine that whether they match the first three criteria is as:

F, T, F, F, F, T, F, F, F, T, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, F

(T = matches, F = Doesn't match)

The call to Any will examine two elements. At that point it knows there is at least one item. It does not examine any more elements, but returns true.

Let's say those that also match the other predicates are as:

F, F, F, F, F, F, F, F, F, F, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, F

Because we've an OrderByDescending it will have to examine every single item, to produce it's result. There's no other way to know which came first.

If it didn't, it would examine 13, consider it "first", and be done.

On the one hand, this general sort of case can be one where ToList() can make things faster - because we reuse query results, rather than just reusing queries, the benefit of storing the intermediate results can outweigh the cost of creating the list.

On the other, other re-uses of queries want exactly this sort of behaviour.

share|improve this answer

The second query does not use the results from the first query. So you are hitting the object with two queries. 1 for the .Any() and 1 for the .First()

If you want to reuse the results from the first query without hitting the object a second time then use ToList() like this:

var query = this._vaporizerData
    .Where(row => row.Coater == coater)
    .Where(row => row.Distributor == distributor)
    .Where(row => row.PowerTubeA.HasValue).ToList();

This will store the first query results in the query, other wise query doesnt hold any values but is actually a statement to make a query.

share|improve this answer
    
What's your basis for assuming that _vaporizerData represents an IQueryable that will result in a database query? For all we know it's just a List. – Servy Aug 30 '12 at 17:19
    
Regardless if it is a db or a list. It is still hitting the datasource _vaporizerData twice, which if you dont know it does that then it can degrade performance. – zeal Aug 30 '12 at 17:21
2  
Check the title of the question - This is Linq to Objects. – Randy Minder Aug 30 '12 at 17:21
    
@Servy in fact, the question specifies LinqToObjects, so we can be fairly sure that _vaporizerData is not IQueryable. – phoog Aug 30 '12 at 17:22
1  
@phoog Yes, exactly, and yet this answer seems to indicate the opposite. – Servy Aug 30 '12 at 17:23

If your base collection has many more objects than your query will return, you probably shouldn't call Any, because, as you suspect, it will most likely result in many of these objects being evaluated twice against the first set of criteria. Instead, execute the first query once by calling ToList or ToArray:

var interimResults = this._vaporizerData 
    .Where(row => row.Coater == coater) 
    .Where(row => row.Distributor == distributor) 
    .Where(row => row.PowerTubeA.HasValue)
    .ToList(); 

if (interimResults.Count > 0) 
{ 
    tubeA = interimResults
        .Where(row => row.CoaterTime.Value >= readTime.AddMinutes(-5)) 
        .Where(row => row.CoaterTime.Value <= readTime) 
        .OrderByDescending(row => row.CoaterTime) 
        .Select(row => row.PowerTubeA) 
        .First() 
        .Value; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Keep in mind he only needs the first result, and the intermediate query hasn't applied all of the filters. You could potentially be copying lots and lots of data to a list only to throw out all but one of them. Jon's answer avoid that problem. – Servy Aug 30 '12 at 17:26
    
@Servy that's true. I suppose Jon's answer is better, but I am just a bit uncomfortable using the ...OrDefault methods. – phoog Aug 30 '12 at 17:29

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