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I have an array of EditText and I want to disable the standard keyboard Android that appears every time I click on them.

these are the parts code I am using:

InputMethodManager imm = (InputMethodManager)getSystemService(
              Context.INPUT_METHOD_SERVICE);
for (i=0;i<dim*dim;i++){

        imm.hideSoftInputFromWindow(value[i].getWindowToken(), 0);
        value[i].setOnTouchListener(this);
        value[i].setOnClickListener(this);
        value[i].setOnFocusChangeListener(this);


    }

EDIT:

I created a new class, with these lines of code:

import android.content.Context;
import android.util.AttributeSet;
import android.widget.EditText;

public class KeyboardControlEditText extends EditText {
private boolean mShowKeyboard = false;

public void setShowKeyboard(boolean value) {
    mShowKeyboard = value;
}

// This constructor has to be overriden
public KeyboardControlEditText(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
    super(context, attrs);
}

// Now tell the VM whether or not we are a text editor
@Override
public boolean onCheckIsTextEditor() {
    return mShowKeyboard;
}
}

and in my main class in OnCreate:

for (i=0;i<dim*dim;i++){

((KeyboardControlEditText) value[i]).setShowKeyboard(false);
value[i].setOnTouchListener(this);
value[i].setOnClickListener(this);


}
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to create your own EditText class for this. Then, override the default onCheckIsTextEditor and return false.

public class NoKeyboardEditText extends EditText {
    // This constructor has to be overriden
    public NoKeyboardEditText(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
    }

    // Now tell the VM that we are not a text editor
    @Override
    public boolean onCheckIsTextEditor() {
        return false;
    }
}

Make sure you substitute in the correct name for the new EditText. For example, if your package is com.example.widget, you'd want to use <com.example.widget.NoKeyboardEditText ... />.

If you need this to be dynamic, you can get even fancier:

public class KeyboardControlEditText extends EditText {
    private boolean mShowKeyboard = false;

    public void setShowKeyboard(boolean value) {
        mShowKeyboard = value;
    }

    // This constructor has to be overriden
    public KeyboardControlEditText(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
    }

    // Now tell the VM whether or not we are a text editor
    @Override
    public boolean onCheckIsTextEditor() {
        return mShowKeyboard;
    }
}

That way, you can call ((KeyboardControlEditText) myEditText).setShowKeyboard(false); to change it at runtime.

share|improve this answer
    
maybe I'm doing something wrong, but I still see the keyboard in Android –  David Aug 30 '12 at 17:51
    
You've changed your XML files to reflect the new class? –  Eric Aug 30 '12 at 17:52
    
I added in Manifest the new class. I edited my post with the lines of code that I'm using now in my main class, trying to use his advice. –  David Aug 30 '12 at 17:59
    
When I say "the XML", I mean your layout files. You know, where you've set <EditText ...? Those have to be changed to use the new class, instead (as I mentioned between code segments above). –  Eric Aug 30 '12 at 17:59
    
the whole layout of the activity where I'm working on is dynamically created in Java code –  David Aug 30 '12 at 18:01
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