Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are the following two boolean expressions the same?

if [ -n $1 ] ; then   
if [ -n "$1" ] ; then

And these two

if [ $? == 0 ] ; then
if [ "$?" == 0 ] ; then

If not - When should you put a variable in quotes?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

put variables in quotes when there is any chance that the value may contain white spaces, or in general NOT be a continuous string of characters. So

as $? should always be something between 0 and 255, you don't need to quote that because it is a return value set after each sub-process returns. It is NOT possible to break that by assigning a string value directly, i.e.

$?=Is of course wrong and should be

 ?=Bad value assigment

because a user variable name must start with [A-Za-z_] , so don't do that ;-)

Whereas for $1, if a value is passed in like

myscript "arg1 with spaces"

the test

if [ -n $1 ] ; then

will blow up,

but the test

if [ -n "$1" ] ; then  

will succeed.

IHTH

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I think I understand it a bit better now. Is there a reason why putting quotes for "$?" causes the boolean to evaluate in an unintended fashion? Like I understand why it would be useful to put "$1" in quotes, but when I put "$?" in quotes it doesn't work. –  user784637 Aug 30 '12 at 18:09
    
See edits. All good points below. +1 for everyone! I'm not sure what you mean that "$?" doesn't work. try set -vx; true ; if [ $? = 0 ] ; then echo passed ; else echo failed ; fi ; false ;f [ $? = 0 ] ; then echo passed ; else echo failed ; fi ; set +vx to see what is happening. Sub in various combos inside the [ ... ] and as a variant [[ .... ]] . Good luck to all. –  shellter Aug 30 '12 at 18:19
    
@shelter: remember that [ $? = 0 ] is a textual comparison. An arithmetic comparison would be (( $? == 0 )) (cold also be [ $? -eq 0 ], but's that's horrible) –  cdarke Aug 31 '12 at 6:48

Using the [ command (yes, it's a command), you should nearly always use quotes. The exceptions are so rare I may not even go into them. For example,

set -- 'x -a -z b'
if [ -n $1 ]; then echo foo; fi
# … crickets
if [ -n "$1" ]; then echo foo; fi
foo

Bash also has the [[ keyword (yes, it's a keyword), which is smart enough to know about expansions and avoid the traps of not quoting. (But it's still usually safe to quote within [[ expressions.)

Since the [ command is POSIX compliant and [[ is a bashism, you decide when to use which.

As for your second example, if you're comparing something to a number, using == is a bashism. If you're writing for bash, use an arithmetic expression, such as

if (( $? == 0 )); then …

But if you're trying for POSIX compliance, write it

if [ "$?" = 0 ]; then …

Often, direct comparisons against $? are a red flag, since comparing the success/failure of a command is exactly what if does:

if somecommand; then …

is better than

somecommand
if (( $? == 0 )); then …

But if you do need to use it, $? is something of an exception, because it is guaranteed to only ever be a single-byte unsigned integer, so it's pretty safe to use unquoted, although it doesn't hurt to quote.

$ false; if [ $? = 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
f
$ true; if [ $? = 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
t
$ false; if [ "$?" = 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
f
$ true; if [ "$?" = 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
t
$ false; if [ $? == 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
f
$ true; if [ $? == 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
t
$ false; if [ "$?" == 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
f
$ true; if [ "$?" == 0 ]; then echo t; else echo f; fi
t
share|improve this answer
    
Actually when I quote "$?" the boolean expression evaluates differently than when I don't quote it... –  user784637 Aug 30 '12 at 18:16
    
@user784637 I don't know how to explain that. It doesn't seem possible, unless something is very wrong with your system or you're misinterpreting the results. I've posted a demonstration in my answer. –  kojiro Aug 30 '12 at 18:23
    
See my edit - is the syntax incorrect for my sample program? –  user784637 Aug 30 '12 at 18:26
    
@user784637 well, $? isn't the number of arguments; it's the success/failure of the most recently-run command. You probably meant $#. –  kojiro Aug 30 '12 at 18:28
    
My bad I'm an idiot –  user784637 Aug 30 '12 at 18:29

They are not always the same. If the variable in question is empty or contains whitespace, the [ command (alias for test) can have too few or too many arguments.

In bash, you can use the builtin [[ -n $1 ]] condition construct that does not split the variable into words before evaluating the condition, which means no double quotes are needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks choroba, I tried to delete the question I posed on askubuntu that you answered regarding this. –  user784637 Aug 30 '12 at 18:07
    
It's not strictly true that "does not expand the variable before evaluating the condition" -- the bash manual says: "Word splitting and filename expansion are not performed on the words between the ‘[[’ and ‘]]’; tilde expansion, parameter and variable expansion, arithmetic expansion, command substitution, process substitution, and quote removal are performed." -- the lack of word splitting is the key here. –  glenn jackman Aug 30 '12 at 22:21
    
@glennjackman: Thanks, fixed. –  choroba Aug 30 '12 at 23:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.