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I just found this very strange behaviour of the numpy linalg.eig algorithm.

If run

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([[1., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
... [0., -1., -0.5, 0., -0.5, 0., 0., 0.], 
... [0., -0.5, 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.], 
... [0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., -0.5, 0.], 
... [0., -0.5, 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.], 
... [0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., -0.5, 0.],  
... [0., 0., 0., -0.5, 0., -0.5, -1., 0.], 
... [0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 1.]])
>>> np.linalg.eig(a)
(array([-1.366,  0.366, -1.366,  0.366,  0.   ,  0.   ,  1.   ,  1.   ]),
array([[ 0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  1.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.   ,  0.   , -0.822,  0.426,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [ 0.   ,  0.   , -0.301, -0.581,  0.13 ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.325, -0.628, -0.123, -0.237, -0.695, -0.707,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [ 0.   ,  0.   , -0.301, -0.581, -0.13 , -0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.325, -0.628, -0.123, -0.237,  0.695,  0.707,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.888,  0.46 , -0.336,  0.174, -0.   , -0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [ 0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  1.   ]]))

I get the wrong eigenvectors (in columns) shown above.

The correct answer is given by

>>> np.linalg.eigh(a)
(array([-1.366, -1.366, -0.   ,  0.   ,  0.366,  0.366,  1.   ,  1.   ]),
 array([[-0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   , -0.   ,  1.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.   , -0.888,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   , -0.46 ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.   , -0.325,  0.   , -0.707,  0.   ,  0.628,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.325,  0.   , -0.707,  0.   , -0.628, -0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [ 0.   , -0.325,  0.   ,  0.707,  0.   ,  0.628,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.325,  0.   ,  0.707,  0.   , -0.628, -0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.888,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.46 , -0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ],
   [-0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   ,  0.   , -0.   ,  0.   ,  1.   ]]))

I'm really surprised that the eig algorithm cannot diagonalize such a simple matrix!

Should I report this behaviour?

EDIT

numpy version 1.6.2

share|improve this question

Everything looks fine to me:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([[1., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
              [0., -1., -0.5, 0., -0.5, 0., 0., 0.], 
              [0., -0.5, 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.], 
              [0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., -0.5, 0.], 
              [0., -0.5, 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0.], 
              [0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., -0.5, 0.],  
              [0., 0., 0., -0.5, 0., -0.5, -1., 0.], 
              [0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 0., 1.]])

fns = np.linalg.eig, np.linalg.eigh
for fn in fns:
    print fn
    ww, vv = fn(a)
    for i in range(len(ww)):
        w = ww[i]
        v = vv[:,i]
        print i, np.allclose(np.dot(a, v),w*v),
    print

produces

<function eig at 0xb5b570d4>
0 True 1 True 2 True 3 True 4 True 5 True 6 True 7 True
<function eigh at 0xb5b5710c>
0 True 1 True 2 True 3 True 4 True 5 True 6 True 7 True
share|improve this answer

All the results shown here are correct.

Because your matrix has two 2D subspaces with eigenvalues = -1.366 and 0.366. And for the 2D subspace you can select different linear combinations of linear independent eigenvectors.

share|improve this answer
    
You answer is correct in principle but if you do the dot product between those eigenvectors you find that they are not orthogonal! >>> evals, evecs = np.linalg.eig(a) >>> np.dot(evecs[2],evecs[3]) 0.084518196456252692 – Pie86 Aug 31 '12 at 8:33
    
@Pie86 The answer is factually correct. When you have multiple eigenvalues you just have to provide linear independent vectors, not orthogonal ones. – Stefano M Sep 2 '12 at 10:47
    
I believe that eigenvectors belonging to linearly independent subspaces (corresponding to different eigenvalues, as in the case of my first comment) should be orthogonal...am I wrong? – Pie86 Sep 3 '12 at 9:15
    
math.stackexchange.com/questions/40246/… question 2. – Pie86 Sep 3 '12 at 9:25
    
The reason is that you are misinterpreting the evecs from np.linalg.eig. The docs say that evecs[:,i] is the i-th eigen vector, not the evecs[i, :]. So in reality everything is orthogonal, as expected ! >>> print max([np.dot(evecs[:,i],evecs[:,j]) for i,j in zip(np.arange(64)/8, np.arange(64)%8) if (np.abs(evals[i]-evals[j])>1e-10)]) >>> 1.11022302463e-16 – sega_sai Sep 3 '12 at 13:00

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