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I'm trying to connect a client side application (written in c++, although that shouldn't have any impact) to a node.js server that is written using express and socket.io.

The server pretty much boils down to:

var express = require('express');
var http = require('http')

var app = express();
var server = http.createServer(app)
var io = require('socket.io').listen(server);

app.use(express.cookieParser());
app.use(express.session({
  ...
}));
app.use(app.router);

// response handling -------
app.get('/', function(req, res){
  console.log('request get /');
});

io.sockets.on('connection', function(socket) {
  console.log('sockets.io connection!');
});
// -------

port = 3000
app.listen(port);
console.log('Listening on port: ' + port);

When I fire up this node I try two things:

  1. I try to connect with a browser. This works in the sense that it will trigger the apt.get('/' ...), but it does not trigger io.sockets.on('connection' ...) which is unexpected and makes me suspicious that I've misunderstood something.
  2. I start my c++ application and call connect on a tcp socket. The socket connects and lets me send data but I never get any indication that something has happened on the node side (and I never get any data back). io.sockets.on('connection' ...) is never fired and no errors about malformed messages come up.

So my question is: have I misunderstood either the setup or function of sockets.io? How can I connect my application to this node server?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firstly, do you include the module-specific socket.io library on the client? Do you connect to the right socket / end-point?

io.connect('http://localhost');

For the native application, you can try using already implemented Socket.IO-modules for C++.

The latter one uses Boost.


If I understood something wrong, please post some debug info by dumping the internal state on a new connection-trial.

share|improve this answer
    
Your second suggestion is along the lines of what I'm trying to do... But, to be honest, I would prefer not to pull in boost or anything large (don't get me wrong, in most cases I love boost). Is it not possible to use a simple socket library to establish a plain old tcp connection and communicate with the node server? –  WestleyArgentum Aug 30 '12 at 18:55
    
What about github.com/ebshimizu/socket.io-clientpp? That should do it. The primary problem is the concept of Socket.io. There is no "socket library". Socket.io uses WebSockets (primary protocol) and implements Adobe Flash sockets, JSONP polling, and AJAX long polling. That is, you could either use a dedicated WebSocket module (e.g. github.com/LearnBoost/websocket.io which would be a clean approach), or a full-featured Socket.io-client framework. However, if you fancy something really fast and full-featured as well as broadly supported with platform support, you should use Faye. –  apx Aug 30 '12 at 19:26
    
Heh, I guess my misunderstanding lay in thinking I could make a simple tcp connection without using websockets. Thanks very much for the help. I think that the way I'm going to move forward is by making an http server and a net server that listen on different ports but then call the same functions (they will each require some set of functions)... just out of curiosity, do you know if this is a common approach? –  WestleyArgentum Aug 30 '12 at 22:11

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