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I have changed my website's root directory - is it possible to create htaccess which will redirect everything to the new root (like all anchors, headers etc) ?

I've tried things such as:

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/$
RewriteRule (.*) http://localhost/root/index.php [R=301,L]

But it only redirects to the new folder when I'm opening localhost/, otherwise if I click an anchor it doesn't redirect anywhere.

This is specifically what I want to achieve:
Anchor is to: localhost/user
I want to redirect it to: localhost/root/user

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I think you have to remove the protocol and the domain. Try

RewriteRule (.*) /root/index.php [R=301,L]

Or maybe

RewriteRule (.*) http:/root/index.php [R=301,L]

share|improve this answer
    
It still doesn't redirect things such as images, but I guess I can't do that without changing the src paths in every tag, right? – user1615069 Aug 30 '12 at 18:39

It still doesn't redirect things such as images, but I guess I can't do that without changing the src paths in every tag, right?

Use capturing groups!

RewriteRule (.*) /root/$1 [R=301,L]

You see, the $1 in there is a reference to the stuff the brackets captured in the pattern. So any and all URIs are redirected to their equivalients in the root folder. This also applies to subfolders, everything ("img/something.jpg" -> "root/img/something.jpg").

However, this rule alone would result in an infinite loop, as the redirected URL would be now rewritten. E.g.: request comes for /index.html, redirected to /root/index.html, but then it's captured again, and redirected to /root/root/index.html... So to deal with this issue we should introduce a RewriteCond, like

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/root/

which would mean: "if the requested URI does not start with '/root/'". These should get you started.


An alternative, perhaps more economical way to do the redirection would be by using the RedirectMatch directive, but the regex is a bit more messy as it needs to include the condition that the rewritten URL should not start with 'root' (to avoid the redirect loop). I can't test this now, but something along the lines of

RedirectMatch ^/(?!root/)(.*) /root/$2

would probably do the trick. (The (?!root) bit is a negative lookahead, and of course such a pattern can be used in a rewriteRule too).

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