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Is there any interpolation approach implemented in R where you can avoid interpolating missing values with negative value?

Let's take a vector:

d <- c(NA, NA, 5000, 17782, NA, NA, 21450, 42320, NA, NA, 52900, 54170, 
60600, 69000, 78000, 87000, 96900, 96900, 122000, 132700, 145000, 
171500, 198900, 213400, 229600, 250200, 272000, 291600, 318000, 
343000, 367000, 419200, 445000, 495000, 540000)

plot(d)

Using cubic spline interpolation

library(zoo)  # for na.spline
d.interpolation <- na.spline(d)

this gives

[1] -100174.12  -31198.04    5000.00   17782.00   16961.75   14160.17   21450.00   42320.00   53674.83
[10]   54841.83   52900.00   54170.00   60600.00   69000.00   78000.00   87000.00   96900.00   96900.00
[19]  122000.00  132700.00  145000.00  171500.00  198900.00  213400.00  229600.00  250200.00  272000.00
[28]  291600.00  318000.00  343000.00  367000.00  419200.00  445000.00  495000.00  540000.00

However, negative values don't make to much sense in this context.

Obviously, something like

d.interpolation <- na.spline(c(0,d))

also won't work.

Do you have any solution to this?

share|improve this question
    
Standard warning applies: what do you expect the actual values should be in the NA locations? If your data are expected to be "smooth," for example, you could replace each NA with mean(d[j-1],d[j+1]) and then do the fit. – Carl Witthoft Aug 30 '12 at 19:59
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could interpolate over log(d):

library(zoo)
d.interpolation <- exp(na.spline(log(d)))
d.interpolation
#  [1]      1.86    282.86   5000.00  17782.00  22424.08  19122.70  21450.00
#  [8]  42320.00  59826.52  58724.79  52900.00  54170.00  60600.00  69000.00
# [15]  78000.00  87000.00  96900.00  96900.00 122000.00 132700.00 145000.00
# [22] 171500.00 198900.00 213400.00 229600.00 250200.00 272000.00 291600.00
# [29] 318000.00 343000.00 367000.00 419200.00 445000.00 495000.00 540000.00

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing me to this option. However, do you know any possiblity how to ensure constantly increasing values? For example 42320, NA, NA, 52900 was replaced by 42320.00 59826.52 58724.79 52900.00. – majom Aug 30 '12 at 19:49
    
@majom -- are you sure that isn't just due to the spline parameters (essentially high-frequency cutoff) applied to the data? – Carl Witthoft Aug 30 '12 at 20:01
    
Since your data seems to follow an exponential, you could just do a linear inter/extra-polation (instead of using splines) in the log-space. I've seen plenty of questions around that combo on SO. – flodel Aug 30 '12 at 20:37
    
Your right for this particular curve d.interpolation <- na.approx(c(0,d)) looks best. – majom Aug 30 '12 at 20:59

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