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Here's my script:

#!/bin/sh

if [ $# -lt 1 ]; then
    echo "Usage: $0 SERVER"
    exit 255
fi

ssh $1 'su;apachectl restart'

I just want it to log in to the server and restart apache, but it needs super-user priviledges to do that. However, after it issues the su command it doesn't stop and wait for me to enter my password. Can I get it to do that?

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3 Answers 3

See if this works for you! This solution takes the password before doing the SSH though...

#!/bin/sh
if [ $# -lt 1 ]; then
    echo "Usage: $0 SERVER"
    exit 255
fi
read -s -p "Password: " PASSWORD
ssh $1 'echo $PASSWORD>su;apachectl restart'

The -s option prevents echoing of the password while reading it from the user.

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-s doesn't seem to work in sh -- works in bash though. But regardless, su just tells me sorry. Not sure you're allowed to pass the password in like that... –  Mark Aug 30 '12 at 20:46
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Take a look at expect. The best way to perform such operations is through an expect script. Here is a sample that I just typed up to give you a head start, but all it does right now is show you how to handle a password in expect.

#!/usr/bin/expect -f

set timeout 60

set pswd    [lindex $argv 0]

send "su\r"
match_max 2000
expect {
    -re "assword:$" {
        sleep 1
        set send_human {.2 .15 .25 .2 .25}
        send -h -- "$pswd\r"
        exp_continue
    } "login failed." {
        send "exit\r"
        log_user 1
        send_user "\r\nLogin failed.\r\n"
        exit 4
    } timeout {
        send "exit\r"
        log_user 1
        send_user "\r\nCommand timed out\r\n"
        exit 1
    } -re "(#|%)\\s*$" {
        # If we get here, then su succeeded
        sleep 1
        send "apachectl restart\r"
        expect {
            -re "(#|%)\\s*$" {
                send "exit\r"
                log_user 1
                send_user "\r\nApache restart Successful\r\n"
                exit 0
            } timeout {
                send "exit\r"
                log_user 1
                send_user "\r\nCommand timed out\r\n"
                exit 1
            }
        }
    } 
}
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Modifying your command to:

ssh -t $1 'sudo apachectl restart'

will open a TTY and allow sudo to interact with the remote system to ask for the user account's password without storing it locally in memory.

You could probably also modify your sudo config on the remote system to allow for execution without a password. You can do this by adding the following to /etc/sudoers (execute visudo and insert this line, substituting <username> appropriately.)

<username> ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL

Also, I'm a security guy and I really hope you understand the implication of allowing an SSH connection (presuming without a passphrase on the key) and remote command execution as root. If not, you should really, really, really rethink your setup here.

[Edit] Better still, edit your sudoers file to allow only apachectl to run without a password. Insert the following and modify %staff to match your user's group, or change that to your username without the percent sign.

%staff          ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /usr/sbin/apachectl

Then your command should simply be changed to:

ssh $1 'sudo apachectl restart'
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nice first post. Thanks for sharing and keep posting! –  shellter Aug 30 '12 at 20:16
    
I don't have sudo on the server. –  Mark Aug 30 '12 at 20:34
    
Mark, I think you can still follow the first suggestion then but modify it to: ssh -t $1 'su;apachectl restart' -- the -t is the important part. –  jth Aug 31 '12 at 20:52
    
Thanks shellter. Not my first post on the StackExchange, but first here on SO. –  jth Aug 31 '12 at 20:54
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