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ISO/IEC 9899:1999

7.13.1.1 The setjmp macro

Environmental limits 4 An invocation of the setjmp macro shall appear only in one of the following contexts: — the entire controlling expression of a selection or iteration statement; — one operand of a relational or equality operator with the other operand an integer constant expression, with the resulting expression being the entire controlling expression of a selection or iteration statement; — the operand of a unary ! operator with the resulting expression being the entire controlling expression of a selection or iteration statement; or — the entire expression of an expression statement (possibly cast to void).

So, the only variants of using setjmp are the following:

if (setjmp(buf))
while (setjmp(buf))
for (;; setjmp(buf))

if (setjmp(buf) == 0)
while (setjmp(buf) == 0)
for (;; setjmp(buf) == 0)

if (!setjmp(buf))
while (!setjmp(buf))
for (;; !setjmp(buf))

setjmp(buf);
(void)setjmp(buf);

And we can't use this statements:

int foo = setjmp(buf);
foo = setjmp(buf);

Right? What they mean by the iteration statement? The last statement of the for loop?

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1  
I think you got the controlling expression of the for statement wrong. It is the middle one. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 31 '12 at 6:54
    
The last two statements with foo = setjmp(buf) are okay due to this: "or — the entire expression of an expression statement (possibly cast to void)" –  jszakmeister Aug 31 '12 at 7:29
    
@jszakmeister: No, an expression statement your garden-variety statement expr;. foo = setjmp(buf); is an expression statement, but the setjmp call is not the entire expression statement, it is just the RHS of the assignment. That subclause allows the statements setjmp(buf); and (void)setjmp(buf); but nothing else. –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 31 '12 at 14:22
    
Doh! You're right @AdamRosenfield. –  jszakmeister Aug 31 '12 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No you can't use

int foo = setjmp(buf);
foo = setjmp(buf);

The reason for the later (assignment) is probably that an assignment is an expression, that can have more than just an identifier on the left side. If the left side is an lvalue expression the standard imposes no order in which the subexpressions are evalutated. So if you have

int* f(void);
*f() = setjmp(buf);

*f() and setjmp(buf) could be evaluated in any order. Since setjmp makes a snapshot of the actual state of the abstract state machine, the semantics of boths orders would be completely different.

For the first line (initialization) this problem doesn't occur, I think. So I guess this could be added as a valid use. But it would have to be discussed carefully if there are no border cases that still require an evaluation on the left side.

(Eric already replied for the selection statements.)

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Selection statements are if (including if…else) and switch. Iteration statements are while, do…while, and for.

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1  
And more specifically, the controlling expression of an iteration statement is the predicate which determines whether or not it will loop: the argument of while or the middle argument of for. –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 30 '12 at 19:43
    
So this two statements will not working? int foo = setjmp(buf); foo = setjmp(buf); –  FrozenHeart Aug 30 '12 at 19:58
1  
@NikitaTrophimov: The language of the C standard means that the C standard does not require setjmp to work when you use it in assignments like that. It might or might not work, depending on your C implementation. Therefore, you cannot rely on it unless your C implementation’s documentation contains guarantees beyond what the C standard requires. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 30 '12 at 20:09
1  
+1 for pointing out switch, the only way to make any practical use of the argument to longjmp. –  R.. Aug 30 '12 at 20:20

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