Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Like this:

input:  10010011
(10->01->00->11)

output: 11000110
(11->00->01->10)


input:  11010001
(11->01->00->01)

output: 01000111
(01->00->01->11)

Anyone has any ideas about that?

share|improve this question
    
An inefficient way would be to chop it up into pairs, then reverse the list of pairs. –  Kevin Mangold Aug 30 '12 at 20:41
    
What have you tried? Basically you're working with a char array, not 'bits', I assume? –  Vernon Aug 30 '12 at 20:41
    
@Luchian It's the bit string read from right to left, in groups of two bits. –  phineas Aug 30 '12 at 20:41
1  
@Vernon It's an array consist of four kinds of char(DNA): A T C G –  Firegun Aug 30 '12 at 20:44
    
So you want the code for a ribosome? :-) –  lserni Aug 30 '12 at 20:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Fewer operations than lserni's algorithm:

uint32_t reverseByTwo(uint32_t value) {
    value = ((value & 0x03030303) << 2) | ((value >> 2) & 0x03030303); // swap adjacent pairs
    value = ((value & 0x0F0F0F0F) << 4) | ((value >> 4) & 0x0F0F0F0F); // swap nibbles
    value = ((value & 0x00FF00FF) << 8) | ((value >> 8) & 0x00FF00FF); // swap bytes
    value = ((value & 0x0000FFFF) << 16) | ((value >> 16) & 0x0000FFFF);
    return value;
}

For 64-bit values just add another swap for the 32-bit halves, for smaller types, just leave out the last few swaps.

share|improve this answer

Weird request. I'd do it like this:

uint32_t reverseByTwo(uint32_t value)
{
    int i;
    uint32_t new_value = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {
        new_value <<= 2;            
        new_value |= (value & 0x3);
        value >>= 2;
    }
    return new_value;
}

At each iteration, the two LSB of value are placed in the two LSB of new_value, which is shifted to the left.

For an eight-bit value,

uint8_t reverseByTwo(uint8_t value)
{
    int i;
    uint32_t new_value = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        new_value <<= 2;            
        new_value |= (value & 0x3);
        value >>= 2;
    }
    return new_value;
}

if performances are at a premium, you can manually unroll the loop (GCC should do this by itself, but sometimes doesn't bother) and declare the function as inline.

    new_value = 0;
    // new_value <<= 2; // First time not necessary
    new_value |= (value & 0x3);
    value >>= 2;
    new_value <<= 2;            
    new_value |= (value & 0x3);
    value >>= 2;
    new_value <<= 2;            
    new_value |= (value & 0x3);
    value >>= 2;
    new_value <<= 2;            
    new_value |= (value & 0x3);
    // value >>= 2; 
    return new_value;
share|improve this answer

The fastest possible way to transform the bits in a single byte (char) into another single byte is to build yourself an array:

unsigned char rev[256];
rev[0]   = 0;     /* 00000000 -> 00000000 */
...
rev[147] = 198;   /* 10010011 -> 11000110 */
...
rev[198] = 147;   /* 11000110 -> 10010011 */
...
rev[255] = 255;   /* 11111111 -> 11111111 */

To convert a number x to its bit-reversed form, just write rev[x]. If you have multiple bytes to convert, such as in a 4-byte int, just look up the 4 bytes in the rev table.

You'll need to convert binary to another base (here, I use decimal) when writing this code, because C doesn't have binary constants (which would be ten times more useful than octal constants).

You could also put the values into the initializer, but you'll have to count positions to make sure everything is in the right place. (Maybe write a little program to do it!)

unsigned char rev[256] = {0, ..., 198, ..., 147, ..., 255};

Fill in the ... with all the other numbers in the right places.

share|improve this answer
    
"Maybe write a little program to do it!" - yes. –  Michael Burr Aug 31 '12 at 0:29
$x = (($x & 0x33333333) << 2) | (($x & 0xCCCCCCCC) >> 2);
$x = (($x & 0x0F0F0F0F) << 4) | (($x & 0xFOFOFOFO) >> 4);
$x = (($x & 0x00FF00FF) << 8) | (($x & 0xFF00FF00) >> 8);
$x = (($x & 0x0000FFFF) << 16) | (($x & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16);

To give credit where due, this algorithm came from "Hacker's Delight" by Henry S. Warren, Jr. The only difference is that the algorithm in the book didn't reverse by pairs; it just reversed the bits.

share|improve this answer
#include <limits.h>

#define INT_BITS  (sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT)

unsigned reverse_bits(unsigned x) {
#define PAIR(i)       ((((x) >> (i*2)) & 3) << (INT_BITS - (i+1)*2))
    unsigned result = 0;
    unsigned i;
    for(i = 0; i < INT_BITS/2; i++) {
        result |= PAIR(i);
    }
    return result;
}

Though this will do it for an unsigned int, whereas you might want to replace int and unsigned there with char and unsigned char.

share|improve this answer

If you want the fastest possible:

output =
  ((input & 0xc0) >> 6) |
  ((input & 0x30) >> 2) |
  ((input & 0xc) << 2) |
  ((input & 0x3) << 6);
share|improve this answer

You have bits (ab cd ef gh) and want (gh ef cd ab)
If you multiply by 0x101 and store in 16 bit int, you get (ab cd ef gh ab cd ef gh).
Then you have your bit pattern in that number in two group of four bits:

  • (00 00 ef 00 ab 00 00 00),
  • (00 00 00 gh 00 cd 00 00)

So you just have to shift and mask appropriately

unsigned char swap_bit_pairs(unsigned char b)
{
    unsigned int a = 0x101*b;
    return ((a >> 6) & 0x33) | ((a >> 2) & 0xCC);
}

So it's possible in 6 operations

EDIT: oups! I wrote 0x66 instead of 0xCC

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.