Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I stumbled onto something with Groovy closures and delegates that I'm not sure is an official part of the language or perhaps even a bug.

Basically i am defining a closure that I read in as a string from an external source, and one of the variables in the class that defines the closure needs to be modified by the closure. I wrote a simple example showing what I found works, and what does not work.

If you look at the test code below you will see a class that defines a variable

animal = "cat"

and two closures defined on the fly from strings that attempt to modify the animal variable.

This works >

    String code = "{ ->   delegate.animal = 'bear';   return name + 'xx' ; }"

But this does not

    String code = "{ ->   animal = 'bear';   return name + 'xx' ; }"

It seems like i need to explicitly qualify my to-be-modified variable with 'delegate.' for this to work. (I guess i can also define a setter in the enclosing class for the closure to call to modify the value.)

So.... I've found out how to make this work, but I'd be interested if someone could point me to some groovy doc that explains the rules behind this.

Specifically.... why will the simple assignment

animal = 'bear' 

affect the original variable ? Are there shadow copies being made here or something ?

welll.. thanks in advance my Groovy hacking friends... 

        - cb


    import org.junit.Test

    /*
     * Author: cbedford
     * Date: 8/30/12
     * Time: 1:16 PM
     */

    class GroovyTest {
        String animal = "cat"
        String name = "fred"

        @Test
        public void testDelegateWithModificationOfDelegateVariable() {
            String code = "{ ->   delegate.animal = 'bear';   return name + 'xx' ; }"
            def shell = new GroovyShell()
            def closure = shell.evaluate(code)

            closure.delegate = this
            def result = closure()

            println "result is $result"
            println "animal is $animal"

            assert animal == 'bear'
            assert result == 'fredxx'
        }


        // This test will FAIL.
        @Test
        public void testDelegateWithFailedModificationOfDelegateVariable() {
            String code = "{ ->   animal = 'bear';   return name + 'xx' ; }"
            def shell = new GroovyShell()
            def closure = shell.evaluate(code)

            closure.delegate = this
            def result = closure()

            println "result is $result"
            println "animal is $animal"

            assert animal == 'bear'
            assert result == 'fredxx'
        }


    }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Groovy closures have five strategies for resolving symbols inside closures:

  • OWNER_FIRST: the owner (where the closure is defined) is checked first, then the delegate
  • OWNER_ONLY: the owner is checked, the delegate is only checked if referenced explicitly
  • DELEGATE_FIRST: the delegate is checked first, then the owner
  • DELEGATE_ONLY: the delegate is checked first, the owner is only checked if referenced explicitly
  • TO_SELF: neither delegate nor owner are checked

The default is OWNER_FIRST. Since the closure is defined dynamically, your owner is a Script object which has special rules itself. Writing animal = 'bear' in a Script will actually create a new binding called animal and assign 'bear' to it.

You can fix your tests to work without explicitly referencing delegate by simply changing the resolve strategy on the closure before calling it with:

closure.resolveStrategy = Closure.DELEGATE_FIRST

This will avoid the odd the Script binding and use the delegate as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes perfect sense. and fast too ;^). thanks a bunch. –  Chris Bedford Aug 30 '12 at 23:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.